Appels à communications

CALL FOR PAPERS

‘Ford and the Other’
Université Paul Valéry, Montpellier
September 7–9, 2017

A conference organised by the Ford Madox Ford Society and EMMA

Proposals are invited for an international conference on Ford Madox Ford and ‘the other’.

The principle underlying Max Saunders’s magisterial biography on Ford is that of duality; of a man forever oscillating between differing versions of himself; between public and inner life; tradition and modernity; reality and authenticity. As Saunders reminds us, a writer’s life, according to Ford, is ‘a dual affair’; and this tenet seems relevant both as regards Ford’s life as a writer and his theoretical and literary writing. At the core of duality lies the idea that one is also always another.

The concepts of alterity and otherness could include the following approaches to Ford and his contemporaries:

  • Ford and empathy;
  • Ford and altruism;
  • the autobiographic dimension of his fictional and critical work – reinventing oneself as other, and conversely, discovering oneself in others;
  • questions of race, nationality, and gender.
  • Another fruitful topic is the question of alterity in terms of other times – for instance with reference to Ford’s historical novels – and other modes of being.
  • Questions of otherness could also involve the Doppelganger motif, which is central to such novels asHenry for Hugh or The Rash Act, but also prevalent in much of Ford’s fictional work.

We welcome papers from established and new scholars which investigate connections with other writers, such as Richard Aldington, Vera Brittain, Elizabeth Bowen, Joseph Conrad, H.D., T. S. Eliot, E. M. Forster, Oliver Madox Hueffer, Violet Hunt, Henry James, David Jones, James Joyce, D. H. Lawrence, Wyndham Lewis, Rose Macaulay, Marcel Proust, Siegfried Sassoon, May Sinclair, Edward Thomas, Rebecca West, Edith Wharton, and Virginia Woolf.

Suggested theoretical frameworks may involve, but should not be limited to, Sigmund Freud; Emmanuel Lévinas; Alain Badiou; Paul Ricœur; Derek Attridge.

We welcome proposals of around 300 words for 20-minutes papers. These should be sent to the conference organiser, Isabelle Brasme (isabellebrasme@gmail.com), by 1 May 2017.

__________________________________________________________________________________________

LONDON CALLING: LAWRENCE AND THE METROPOLIS
THE 14TH INTERNATIONAL D.H. LAWRENCE CONFERENCE
JULY 3-8 2017

 Image1

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS:

  • DAVID GAME
  • PAUL POPLAWSKI
  • JUDITH RUDERMAN
  • MARIANNA TORGOVNICK
  • PATRICK FLANERY

INTRODUCTION
London played a crucial role in Lawrence’s early life: he taught here, got his first literary breaks here, and even got married here in 1914. It was in London that he met the friends and patrons who launched his career and facilitated his travels, and whenever he and Frieda returned to England, it was to London that they came first.

Lawrence visited London around fifty times – for the first time in October 1908 for his interview for a teaching position in Croydon, and for the last time in September 1926. Over those eighteen years he visited or lived in London in every single year, apart from during his travels in 1920-22.

He saw the city grow from seven to eight million people, and become the metropolis we know today, with  its buses, trams, private cars, bridges, Underground stations, West End theatres, and electric street lights. He knew London as it was approaching the historical peak population; this was followed by decline, and which has only just (in 2015) been exceeded.

He knew the London of the Edwardian period, of the War, and of the jazz age. He knew middle-class outer-suburban Croydon, but also some of London’s most fashionable districts, where his friends lived: Hampstead (Edward Garnett, Dollie Radford and Catherine Carswell), St. John’s Wood (Koteliansky), Mecklenburgh Square (H.D. and Richard Aldington), and Bedford Square (Lady Ottoline Morrell).

London was the legal, as well as the literary, artistic and theatrical, centre of England.  In 1913 Frieda’s divorce hearing was heard there; in 1915 Lawrence was examined for bankruptcy at its High Court; in the same year The Rainbow was tried at Bow Street Magistrate’s Court; in 1927 David was produced at the Regent Theatre; in 1928 Catherine Carswell oversaw the typing of part of Lady Chatterley’s Lover there; in 1928 Lawrence explained ‘Why I Don’t Like Living in London’ in The Evening News; and in 1929 his paintings were exhibited at the Warren Street gallery and impounded.

Given his hatred of London’s intellectualism and authoritarianism, and his objections to metropolises in general, it is not surprising that much of what Lawrence writes about London is negative. But, as he admitted in 1928, ‘It used not to be so. Twenty years ago, London was to me thrilling, thrilling, thrilling, the vast and throbbing heart of all adventure.’

For such a nodal city – the world’s biggest city, the heart of the world’s biggest empire, and a centre of international modernism – it has a peripheral place in his work and in work about him. But Lawrence could not have become the person and writer he did without having known his native capital city.

The 14th International D. H. Lawrence conference will be held in London at the College of the Humanities, Bedford Square, and nearby venues. It is authorized by the Coordinating Committee for International Lawrence Conferences (CCILC) and organized in collaboration with the D. H. Lawrence Society of North America and the D. H.  Lawrence Society (UK).

The conference welcomes papers on topics including but not limited to:

  • Lawrence’s experiences of, and/or reactions to, London and its various social groups and geographical districts
  • Lawrence’s relationships with individual Londoners
  • Lawrence’s interactions with London-based journals and publishers
  • The suppression of The Rainbow
  • The premiere of David in London
  • Lawrence’s exhibition of paintings at the Warren Street Gallery
  • Works written by Lawrence while he was resident in London
  • Lawrence’s responses to and thoughts about cities in general

Papers are welcome from Lawrence scholars, graduate students, and the public.
Papers should last no longer than 20 minutes, and will be followed by 10 minutes of questions. They will be presented in a panel together with two other papers.

If you would like to contribute, please send an abstract of up to 500 words to the Executive Director, Dr. Catherine Brown: catherinelawrencelondon@gmail.com by midnight on 28th February 2017. Submissions will be assessed by the Academic Program Committee detailed below, and responses will be issued by 15th March  2017.

The abstract should include the following information as part of the same file (in either MS Word or pdf format):

  • Your name, postal address, telephone number, and email address
  • The name of the institution (if applicable) at which you are registered
  • Your CV (1 page condensed version)
  • Please indicate if you need OHP or other such media equipment for your presentation.

The Conference Fee is expected to be approximately £280-320 for the week.
The Fee includes payment for attendance at academic sessions, four lunches, all tea/coffee breaks, and two dinners including the Gala Award Dinner on Thursday evening.

The Conference website may be found here: http://dhlawrencesociety.com/home/14th-international-d-h-lawrence-conference-london/

CONFERENCE COMMITTEE
Executive Director Catherine Brown
Conference Treasurer Kim Hooper
International Liaison and Assistant Treasurer Jonathan Long
Conference Webmaster Joseph Shafer
Conference Designer Stephen Alexander
Conference Tour Director Maria Thanassa
Conference Awards Organizer President of the DH Lawrence Society of North America
Graduate Fellowships Committee Chair Andrew Harrison
Accommodation Director Ted Simonds
Conference Consultants Nancy Paxton and Betsy Sargent
Academic Program Committee
International:
Australia:        David Game, Christopher Pollnitz
Canada:          Betsy Sargent, Laurence Steven
France:            Ginette Roy
Germany:        Christa Jansohn, Dieter Mehl
Italy:               Simonetta de Filippis, Nicholas Ceramella
Japan:              Masashi Asai
Montenegro:   Marija Krivokapic
South Korea: Doo-Sun Ryu
South Africa: Dawid de Villiers
Sweden:          Margrét Gunnarsdóttir Champion
USA:              Holly Laird, Nancy Paxton
British:
Michael Bell
Howard Booth
Catherine Brown
David Ellis
Andrew Harrison
Bethan Jones
Sean Matthews
Sue Reid
Neil Roberts
Jeff Wallace

__________________________________________________________________________________________

Mémoires de l’esclavage et de la colonisation : Historiographie, arts, musées

Ce colloque vise à promouvoir une approche comparatiste entre la mémoire relative à l’esclavage et à celle de la colonisation ; il s’agira d’interroger les processus mémoriels à travers les représentations du passé dans les arts contemporains (littérature, photographie, arts plastiques, films) et les discours historiographiques qu’ils véhiculent. Les participants questionneront l’utilisation d’images de violence raciale, leur intégration dans des projets artistiques et photographiques, et leur narrativisation dans la littérature (romans, récits de vie, autobiographie, biographie). Seront également évoqués les débats éthiques qui sous-tendent l’appropriation de ce type d’images dans divers projets artistiques. L’impact de ces images traumatiques sur des générations entières sera étudié à travers la comparaison de documents datant de différentes périodes.

L’histoire de la colonisation est contemporaine au développement des images et de leur reproductibilité technique, de la lithographie au cinéma en passant par la photographie et les modes d’écriture. Diffusées en Europe et en Amérique pour renforcer la domination coloniale et des imaginaires, les images de l’époque coloniale sont également sources de questionnement sur les représentations des colonisés. De telles images accompagnent parfois les textes littéraires qui deviennent alors des « espaces mémoriels », transmettant des références historiques et culturelles. L’étude des photographies anthropométriques, ou d’autres types d’images destinées à des sociétés savantes, et de l’art (post-)colonial nous permettra d’éclairer l’articulation entre art et propagande idéologique, dénonciation et militantisme.

Dans le domaine des littératures africaines et afro-américaines, les écrivains soulignent la nécessité de recouvrer une histoire occultée durant la période coloniale en écrivant une histoire des peuples fondée sur les traces de la mémoire. Alors que se pose la question de la légitimité historique de la réécriture de l’Histoire influencée par l’affect de la mémoire, ces récits témoignent aussi des phénomènes de syncrétisme religieux et culturel. La littérature peut donc être une source de savoir historique, interrogeant par exemple la participation des esclaves africains aux entreprises de conquête et celle des esclaves et des affranchis dans les guerres d’indépendance américaines, africaines et hispano-américaines.

La musique populaire et le folklore (contes, proverbes) sont aussi des espaces de subversion qui ont permis aux populations dominées de maintenir un lien avec le passé et de transmettre des traditions dévalorisées par la culture dominante. Bien que la présence de populations africaines sur le territoire hispano-américain ait longtemps été minimisée, l’héritage humain et culturel transmis par les anciens esclaves dans des pays comme la Colombie ou le Mexique est désormais reconnu et valorisé dans l’espace public à travers, notamment, des expositions, des fêtes, des conférences-débats, des publications. Les politiques de mémorialisation (notamment la notion très controversée de « réparation ») adoptées seront étudiées et comparées, permettant aux chercheurs de croiser leur regard sur l’Amérique du Nord, l’Amérique du Sud, l’Afrique ou encore l’Océanie.

Par ailleurs, le contexte historiographique a considérablement changé depuis la fin des années 1980 ; les outils informatiques utiles aux historiens se sont multipliés. Le passage aux « humanités numériques » a fait de l’ordinateur et des ressources auxquelles il donne accès un instrument indispensable à tout chercheur. On se demandera comment ces nouveaux dispositifs numériques peuvent mettre à jour de nouvelles mémoires de l’esclavage et de la colonisation. Les apports culturels des peuples africains et des afro-descendants en Amérique du Nord et en Amérique Latine dans le domaine de la culture matérielle et immatérielle nous intéressent également.

La scénographie des musées et des expositions fera l’objet d’une attention particulière, en particulier la manière dont la mémoire de l’esclavage a été transmise et mise en scène dans les territoires décolonisés ou dans les anciens Empires. Du National Museum of African American History and Culture (Washington) au Musée du Quai Branly (Paris), du Mémorial de l’abolition de l’esclavage (Nantes) à la Maison des esclaves (Ile de Gorée), du Fort Zanzibar au Fort de Cape Coast (Ghana), du Musée du Noir (Rio de Janeiro) au Musée Ogier Fombrun (République d’Haïti), les activités de médiation et de mise en scène muséales seront étudiées. Le cas du Musée de la Commission de la Vérité et de la Réconciliation et la transformation de Robben Island en musée en Afrique du Sud seront évoqués. On se penchera sur l’un des paradoxes de ces institutions, censées être musées des cultures du monde : les civilisations et les arts dits « primitifs » ou « premiers » ne reçoivent aucun témoignage de ce qu’ils furent dans les territoires européens. Par ailleurs, les objets ethnographiques peuvent fabriquer une image désincarnée de l’esclavage ou de la colonisation, une représentation exote qui ne rend pas compte de l’expérience des esclaves ou des colonisés.

L’objectif n’est pas de dresser une typologie des différentes images coloniales mais, à l’aune de leur diversité, de conduire une réflexion sur la manière dont ces visuels ont façonné les imaginaires, de l’époque coloniale depuis le XIXe siècle à l’époque postcoloniale. Il s’agira également d’identifier les oublis de l’histoire de l’esclavage en interrogeant les processus mémoriels officiels et/ou populaires.

Comité d’organisation : Eliane Elmaleh (3L.AM, University of Maine), Benaouda Ledai (3LA.M, University of Maine), Delphine Letort (3L.AM, University of Maine), Claudine Raynaud (Emma, Université Paul Valéry, Montpellier 3).

Pour toute information complémentaire, veuillez consulter : https://slavery.sciencesconf.org

Les propositions (env. 250 mots) et une courte biographie sont à envoyer à Benaouda.Lebdai@univ-lemans.fr,Eliane.Elmaleh@univ-lemans.fr, Delphine.Letort@univ-lemans.frClaudine.Raynaud@univ-montp3.fr  avant le 31 mars 2017.

 

Memories of Slavery and Colonization: Historiography, Arts, and Museums

This conference aims to promote a comparative approach to memories of slavery and colonization: we intend to question memory processes through representations of the past in contemporary arts (literature, photography, plastic arts, films) and in-depth studies of their historiographical discourse. Participants will examine the use of images of racial violence, their insertion in artistic and photographic projects, and their narrativisation in literature (novel, life writing, autobiography, biography). They will address the ethical issues underlying the appropriation of these images in a variety of artistic endeavours and analyze their impact on subsequent generations through comparing documents from different periods.

From lithography and cinema to photography and writing, the history of colonization is contemporary with the development of mechanical visual reproduction. Disseminated across Europe and America to strengthen colonial domination and to shape the collective imagination, images of colonialism open up question about the representations of colonized people. Such images sometimes adorn literary texts that turn into tools of memory and become “memorial spaces” conveying historical and cultural knowledge. The study of (post)colonial art and photographs – be they made for anthropometric measurements or aimed at learned societies – helps enlighten the relationships between ideology and propaganda, denunciation and activism.

In the field of African and African-American literature, writers debate the necessity of retrieving a forgotten history from the colonial period by reconstructing a peoples’ history from memory traces. While one might question the historical legitimacy of reconstructions of the past when influenced by the affect of memory, such literary works further illustrate the notion of religious and cultural syncretism. Literature can be a source of historical knowledge that we also want to examine, broaching such topic as the treatment of the participation of African slaves in the processes of conquest and the role of slaves and freedman in the American, African and Spanish-American independence wars.

Popular music and folklore (tales, proverbs) provide spaces of subversion that enabled the dominated population to maintain a link with the past and to transmit traditions undervalued by the dominant culture. Although the presence of African populations on the Hispano-American territories was long downplayed, the cultural and human heritage of former slaves is now acknowledged and respected in such countries as Columbia and Mexico through exhibitions, celebrations, conferences, public debates and publications. The politics of memorialization (including the highly controversial notion of “reparation”) adopted in North America, South America, Africa and Oceania can usefully be analyzed and compared.

The historiographical context has considerably changed since the late 1980s with the development of computer-based tools providing access to useful sources for historians and scholars adapting to the digital humanities. One may therefore wonder whether the new digital tools can help bring up memories of slavery and colonization. The cultural heritage of African and Afro-descendant people in North and Latin America also feeds into material and immaterial culture, which provides another topic to be explored.

Special attention will be devoted to the scenography of museums and exhibitions, which transmit and stage the memory of slavery in the decolonized territories or in the former Empires. From the National Museum of African American History and Culture (Washington) to the Musée du Quai Branly (Paris), from the Memorial for the abolition of Slavery (Nantes) to the House of Slaves (Goree Island), from the Old Fort of Zanzibar to Cape Coast Castle (Ghana), from the Museu do Negro (Rio de Janeiro) to the Musée Ogier Fombrun (Haïti), mediation activities and museum scenography will provide case studies. The Apartheid Museum and the transformation of Robben Island into a museum in South Africa are also of interest. One may consider the paradoxical situation of these institutions as museums of world culture that exhibit the so-called “primitive” artifacts and civilization without taking into account their function in the European territories. Ethnographic objects may also buttress a disembodied image of slavery and colonization, a representation of the “exotic other” that does not translate the slave’s or the colonized’s experience.

Rather than set up a typology of colonial images, the goal of the conference is to spur reflection on the manners in which this variety of visuals has fashioned imaginaries from the colonial era to the 19th century to the postcolonial period. We aim to retrieve some of the forgotten histories of slavery while questioning official and popular memorial processes.

Organizing Committee: Eliane Elmaleh (3L.AM, University of Maine), Benaouda Ledai (3LA.M, University of Maine), Delphine Letort (3L.AM, University of Maine), Claudine Raynaud (Emma, Université Paul Valéry, Montpellier 3).

More information is available at https://slavery.sciencesconf.org

Please send your abstract (about 250 words) and a short biography to Benaouda.Lebdai@univ-lemans.fr,Eliane.Elmaleh@univ-lemans.fr, Delphine.Letort@univ-lemans.frClaudine.Raynaud@univ-montp3.fr before March 31, 2017.

__________________________________________________________________________________________

The Past is Back on Stage – Medieval and Early Modern England on the Contemporary Stage

EMMA, University Paul-Valéry Montpellier 3, France

26-27 May, 2017

Keynote speaker: David Edgar, playwright.

From the 1960s when Robert Bolt wrote A Man for All Seasons first for BBC radio, then for television and finally for the stage, to the 2010s when Hilary Mantel’s successful novel Wolf Hall was adapted to the stage and then for television, the past several decades have witnessed a renewed interest in medieval and early modern England among contemporary writers and audiences.

The extended period from the Protestant Reformation to the Glorious Revolution provides novelists, playwrights, and screenwriters with material through which to engage pressing current issues, and the success of their works among diverse socio-economic, ethnic, and generational groups indicates a popular phenomenon that reaches beyond academic and artistic communities.

This international conference, organized by EMMA at University Paul-Valéry in Montpellier, France, aims to understand why contemporary playwrights find this particular past appealing. More precisely, it aims to shed light on the political and cultural significance of medieval and early modern England for twentieth- and twenty-first century writers and audiences.

Centring on contemporary theatre in the English-speaking world, it invites scholars of medieval, early modern, and contemporary drama, performance, and culture to submit papers on any of the following topics:
–       History Plays: what do playwrights deem useful about the past in the creation of politically-committed theatre? Could such a distant period be considered as a valid mirror image of our contemporary world? How are the uses of the past today comparable to the way it was used by medieval and early modern dramatic writers?
–       Medieval Exceptionality: why is this particular period of English history seen as a cultural reference which is understood and appropriated world-wide?
The Place of Diversity: how do women, racial and ethnic minorities, writers from nations and national traditions outside England, respond to and use the medieval English past?
–       Rewriting History: what is the cultural, historical and political bias of contemporary writers and audiences?
–       Recreation and Entertainment: the choice of certain historical figures as new heroes may be discussed, as well as the way those historical figures may be depicted as endearing champions of the Good, or loathsome villains, for the entertainment of audiences today.
–       Canonicity and Beyond: to what extent and in what ways do contemporary playwrights allude to, adapt, endorse, expand on and/or critique the canon?
–       Adapting Elizabethan Theatre: how do contemporary playwrights, stage-directors or theatre companies rewrite and renew Elizabethan plays for contemporary audiences? How can they use the assets of site-specific performance?

Our plenary speaker will be British playwright and writer David Edgar, who has had more than sixty of his plays published and performed on stage, radio and television around the world. Edgar has repeatedly looked to other periods and other writers to engage the stage and screen as media for political activism. Most recently, in Written on the Heart, which was produced in 2011 by the Royal Shakespeare Company on the occasion of the four-hundredth anniversary of the King James Bible, Edgar exposed the historical situatedness and composite composition of this “authoritative” text of scripture.

Please send proposals of no more than 300 words in English and a brief CV indicating your institutional affiliation to Marianne Drugeon (marianne.drugeon@univ-montp3.fr) by January 31, 2017. Notification of acceptance will be sent by March 15, 2017.

 

Le passé retrouvé – Le XVIe et le XVIIe siècles anglais sur la scène contemporaine

EMMA, Université Paul-Valéry Montpellier 3, France

26-27 mai 2017

 Conférence plénière : David Edgar, dramaturge.

Depuis les années 1960 lorsque Robert Bolt écrivait A Man for All Seasons pour la radio, la télévision puis la scène, jusqu’aux années 2010 lorsque le roman à succès de Hilary Mantel, Wolf Hall s’est vu adapté à la scène puis à l’écran, les dernières décennies témoignent d’un engouement renouvelé pour l’histoire de l’Angleterre, de l’avènement d’Henry VIII en 1509 à la Glorieuse Révolution de 1688, à la fois de la part des auteurs et du public.

La monarchie des Tudor, la Réforme anglicane, les époques élisabéthaine et jacobéenne, mais aussi la Révolution menée par Cromwell ainsi que la restauration de la monarchie sont autant de sources d’inspiration pour les romanciers, les dramaturges et les scénaristes de télévision et de cinéma contemporains, qui rencontrent un franc succès auprès du grand public.

Cette conférence internationale, organisée par EMMA à l’université Paul-Valéry – Montpellier 3, cherche à comprendre cet intérêt particulier des auteurs contemporains pour une période de l’histoire ancienne et à mettre en lumière les liens politiques et culturels qui unissent l’Angleterre du XVIe et du XVIIe siècles avec le monde de la fin du XXe et du début du XXIe siècles.

Nous invitons les chercheurs spécialisés dans la culture, les arts et le théâtre contemporains, mais aussi des XVIe et XVIIe siècles, à proposer leur contribution sur les sujets suivants :
–       Pièces historiques : pourquoi les auteurs engagés considèrent-ils cette période lointaine du passé comme un miroir du monde contemporain ? Comment cette évocation peut-elle servir leur engagement politique ? Ces pièces sont-elles des clés pour comprendre le monde politique actuel ? Les pièces historiques du théâtre élisabéthain sont-elles comparables aux pièces historiques d’aujourd’hui ?
L’exception culturelle : pourquoi et comment une période de l’histoire de l’Angleterre est-elle perçue comme une référence culturelle valide et adaptable dans le monde entier ?
–       Diversité : comment les écrivains issus de la diversité s’approprient-ils ce modèle afin de l’adapter à un contexte géographique, ethnique, socio-culturel ou générationnel différent ?
–       Réécrire l’histoire : quels sont les partis pris et les choix subjectifs adoptés par les auteurs contemporains ?
–       Recréation et récréation : on pourra s’interroger sur le choix de certaines figures historiques spécifiques, et sur la façon dont elles ont pu être transformées en héros de la cause juste, ou en antihéros détestables, toujours pour le divertissement du public.
–       Les pièces classiques et leurs réécritures : dans quelle mesure et de quelle manière les dramaturges contemporains font-ils allusion aux œuvres classiques ? Comment les adaptent-ils, à quel point les remettent-ils en question, en redéfinissent-ils les contours ?
–       Adapter le théâtre élisabéthain : pourquoi et comment les auteurs, les metteurs-en-scène et les troupes de théâtre contemporains réécrivent-ils les pièces de l’époque pour les adapter au public d’aujourd’hui ? Dans quelle mesure le choix d’un lieu spécifique pour la représentation de ces pièces peut-il devenir un atout ?

David Edgar, auteur et dramaturge britannique qui a écrit, publié et monté plus d’une soixantaine de pièces pour la scène, la radio et la télévision dans le monde entier, ouvrira la conférence. Edgar, auteur engagé, s’est souvent inspiré de périodes historiques plus ou moins lointaines pour mieux s’adresser à son public sur des sujets d’actualité. A l’occasion du quadricentenaire de la Bible du roi Jacques en 2011, il a écrit Written on the Heart, mis en scène par la Royal Shakespeare Company ; cette pièce expose le contexte historique, les enjeux politiques et diplomatiques et met au jour la nature composite de la première traduction de la Bible en vernaculaire.

 Les propositions en anglais, d’environ 300 mots, ainsi qu’une courte biographie précisant le rattachement institutionnel, sont à envoyer à Marianne Drugeon (marianne.drugeon@univ-montp3.fr) avant le 31 janvier 2017. Les auteur(e)s de propositions acceptées seront informé(e)s le 15 mars 2017.

__________________________________________________________________________________________

Conference « Neoliberalism in the Anglophone world »
Université Paul-Valéry Montpellier 3
Friday, March 10th and Saturday, March 11th, 2017

References to neoliberalism in Anglophone scholarly research are commonplace, and have increased exponentially over the past couple of decades. While the first handful of citations to articles featuring the term ‘neoliberalism’ or ‘neo-liberalism’ in their title occurred in only 1992, there were over a 200 a year by the end of the 1990s, almost a 1000 by 2005, over 4000 in 2010, and almost 10,000 in 2015 (Web of Science, 2016). Such interest seems unlikely to subside in the foreseeable future. Prompted by the dramatic onset of the global financial crisis (2008-ongoing), which was purportedly the result of neoliberal logic, and the subsequent intensification of the familiar policies of ‘regulatory restraint, privatisation, rolling tax cuts, and public-sector austerity’ through an even more relentless focus on ‘growth restoration, deficit reduction and budgetary restraint’ (Peck, 2013: 3-5), there has also recently been an abundance of public debate on the efficacy, validity and legitimacy of neoliberal policies.

According to a recent survey of British social attitudes, for example, the years of neoliberal austerity since the financial crash of 2008 have entrenched class divisions, and hardened attitudes towards both immigrants and the political establishment. While the consequences of neoliberal policies on British society were, it seems, a likely factor in the recent referendum result in favour of the UK leaving the European Union, it is noteworthy that both the Leave and Remain campaigns held remarkably similar views on neoliberal policies such as free markets and austerity, as well as the desirability of immigration controls (Freedman, 2016). Consensus on these wider issues can also be seen in the policy proposals of the leading Republican and Democratic candidates in the US.

Despite (or perhaps because of) such promiscuity, however, the term itself has been prone to inflation (Peck, 2013: 17), and for some it has become an ‘overblown’ concept (Collier, 2012) that tends to be applied (in an invariably disapproving way) to pretty much anything today (Allison & Piot, 2011: 5).

This conference aims at presenting a critical overview of issues related to neoliberalism in the Anglophone world. It will be broad in scope by covering British, American and the other English-speaking areas, as well as the fields of civilisation, literature and linguistics, while maintaining a thematic focus on the concept of neoliberalism from international and interdisciplinary perspectives.

We are particularly interested in receiving abstracts on one or more of the following themes:
– the theoretical and methodological approaches and theorists drawn on when critiquing neoliberalism, either in Anglophone academic literature generally or in specific disciplines or contexts. For example, whether neoliberalism is understood as an ideological and hegemonic project (David Harvey, Stuart Hall), governmentality (Michel Foucault) or discourse (Ernest Laclau and Chantal Mouffe), and whether it is analysed using methodological approaches informed by one or another of these theoretical perspectives.
– the neoliberalisation of politics, parties and politicians in the Anglophone world, as well as public policy in a number of areas (culture, education, health, housing etc.).
– the effects of neoliberalism on identity and society (the emergence of the neoliberal/entrepreneurial self; intersections with gender, sexuality and “race”; neoliberalism as embodiment or affect; the experience of individuals reconfigured as consumers in various domains).
– the exploration and representation of neoliberalism in literature, art and culture more widely.
– the effect of neoliberalism on language; for example, the ubiquity of occurrences of ‘demand’, ‘competition’, ‘efficiency’, ‘cost-effectiveness’, ‘best practice’ in a range of documents.

Abstracts in English should be submitted to the organisers (below) by October 15th, 2016.

The papers given at the conference may be submitted for a special issue of Angles (http://angles.saesfrance.org/), to be published in late 2017 – early 2018. We will also be keen to include submissions that are not necessarily scholarly articles: multimedia artworks, photo-essays, political manifestos; as well as reviews of key texts (academic or otherwise) or interviews with key figures on neoliberalism in the Anglophone world. This may be taken into consideration when submitting abstracts for the conference, where diverse formats will be welcome.

Organisers:
Simon Dawes, Université de Versailles Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines, CHCSC: simondawes0 [a] gmail.com
Marc Lenormand, Université Paul-Valéry Montpellier 3, EMMA: Marc.Lenormand [a] univ-montp.3.fr

Advisory committee:
Phil Carr, Université Paul-Valéry Montpellier 3, EMMA
Vincent Dussol, Université Paul-Valéry Montpellier 3, EMMA
Des Freedman, Goldsmiths College, University of London
Nicolas Gachon, Université Paul-Valéry Montpellier 3, EMMA
Nicholas Gane, University of Warwick
Rosalind Gill, City University, University of London
Johnna Montgomerie, Goldsmiths College, University of London
Anne-Marie Motard, Université Paul-Valéry Montpellier 3, EMMA
Srila Roy, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg

neoliberalism_conference_CFP

__________________________________________________________________________________________

Traces et mémoires de l’esclavage dans l’espace atlantique
Université Paul Valéry,Montpellier, France
1-2 décembre 2016

Conférencières plénières
Ana Lucia Araujo (Howard University)
Christine Chivallon (Directrice de recherche LAM-CNRS)

Dans Cultural Trauma: Slavery and the Formation of African American Identity (2001)[1], Ron Eyerman explore la formation de l’identité africaine américaine à travers le traumatisme culturel de l’esclavage. Au-delà de son impact direct sur celles et ceux qui ont subi l’esclavage, Eyerman considère qu’en tant que processus culturel, le traumatisme est « transmis par l’intermédiaire de diverses formes de représentation et associé à la formation d’une identité et à la construction d’une mémoire collectives ». Cette conférence internationale cherche à examiner les fondements, les mécanismes et l’étendue de ces processus mémoriels. Il s’agira d’explorer une réalité de l’esclavage adossée à la mémoire humaine, à la (re)construction de la mémoire de trajectoires et de migrations individuelles, collectives ou familiales transmises de génération en génération.

La conférence Traces et Mémoires de l’Esclavage dans l’Espace Atlantique se propose d’interroger la façon dont les descendants reconstruisent l’histoire de leurs ancêtres dès lors que l’esclavage pratiqué dans le cadre de la traite transatlantique figure parmi les paramètres du processus mémoriel. Elle entend également analyser comment, par un processus de collectivisation de mémoires et d’histoires personnelles ou familiales, les acteurs sociaux du présent contribuent non seulement à générer et à consolider des identités de groupes mais également à favoriser « l’émergence de la mémoire de l’esclavage dans l’espace public »[2]. Outre la redistribution culturelle et symbolique que peuvent suggérer des phénomènes de commémoration, de muséification et de patrimonialisation de la mémoire de l’esclavage, cette conférence souhaite également observer les contraintes que suppose son insertion dans l’espace public en analysant combien la demande sociale, notamment dans le cadre de revendications de devoirs de mémoire, influence la production de la connaissance historique et donne parfois lieu à des conflits de mémoires.

Peut-on affirmer avec Ira Berlin que « l’histoire et la mémoire interrogent toutes deux la question de l’esclavage […] mais qu’elles le font dans des langues différentes »?[3] Dans le contexte traumatique et post-traumatique de l’esclavage, la question des métissages et des souffrances qui les entourent parfois appelle un examen spécifique : les mécanismes de (re)construction mémorielle peuvent-ils, que ce soit d’un point de vue psychologique ou historique, prétendre à la neutralité ? Est-ce là leur vocation ? L’importance historique et stratégique de Gorée, sa charge symbolique et émotionnelle, et sa fonction mémorielle s’insèreront utilement dans la réflexion. Dans la même veine, des exemples de ce qu’Ana Lucia Araujo qualifie de « re(m)placement mémoriel », un processus selon lequel « une population locale s’approprie un bâtiment ou un site existant et attribue un passé lié à la traite atlantique et à l’esclavage, comme s’il s’agissait d’un véritable site historique, »[4] pourront être pris en considération.

Cette conférence internationale et pluridisciplinaire invite des communications en forme d’études de cas précis, d’analyses visant à dégager des constantes générales et des travaux comparatifs. Le champ géographique retenu englobe la totalité de l’espace atlantique, non pas pour privilégier des travaux sur les interactions entre servitude et capitalisme mais dans le sens où cette modernité-là, modernité mémorielle, transcende les individus, les « races », les nations, l’espace et le temps. Le champ géographique est donc large à dessein. Parce que la mémoire de faits remontant à plusieurs générations ne peut être que parcellaire, transmise et reconstruite, les lignes de force signifiantes du processus mémoriel feront l’objet d’une attention particulière.

La réflexion pourra se nourrir de travaux théoriques récents, dont ceux de Michael Rothberg[5] (2009) pour qui la mémoire se construit sur la base de focalisations multidirectionnelles et de synergies entre des événements apparemment déconnectés dans le temps et dans l’espace (Multidirectional Memory), et de Max Silverman[6] (2013) qui s’intéresse notamment à la « condensation » de traces spatio-temporelles différentes et parfois disparates (Palimpsestic Memory). Il pourra être intéressant de démêler les fils de constructions mémorielles familiales en déconstruisant des trajectoires d’individus fondateurs. Les traces archivistiques de moments clés pourront ainsi être convoquées pour interroger et préciser le contexte historique de ces trajectoires et/ou pour éclairer des trajectoires parallèles, celles par exemple de personnages plus connus. La recherche généalogique offre un terrain propice à la confrontation entre traces et mémoire, à la mise en exergue des mécanismes qui permettent de recréer des parcours déchiffrables, historiquement crédibles et psychologiquement acceptables dans les interstices laissés par les éléments factuels transmis par les générations. La question de la facture presque nécessairement ethnocentrique du prisme mémoriel pourra également être visitée.

Les participants pourront s’interroger sur les pistes, non exhaustives, de réflexion suivantes : 
– l’histoire et la mémoire de l’esclavage ;
– la mémorialisation de l’esclavage ;
– la canonisation de la mémoire de l’esclavage ;
– la/es représentation(s) de l’esclavage ;
– la commémoration, la muséification et la patrimonialisation de la mémoire de l’esclavage ;
– les lieux et les conditions de production et de circulation de savoirs sur l’esclavage ;
– l’héritage/les héritages de l’esclavage et la (re)construction d’une identité (collective) ;
– l’esclavage et la généalogie ;
– les sources et les archives sur l’esclavage.

Modalités de soumission :
Les langues de la conférence sont l’anglais et le français. Les propositions de 300 mots maximum, incluant un titre et le rattachement institutionnel, ainsi qu’une courte biographie sont à envoyer à traces2016@gmail.com avant le 29 février 2016. Les auteur(e)s de propositions acceptées seront informé(e)s le 31 mars 2016. Les propositions couvrant la totalité de l’espace atlantique sont bienvenues, ainsi que les propositions de tables rondes.

Comité d’organisation :
Lawrence Aje (Université Paul-Valéry, Montpellier – EMMA)
Nicolas Gachon (Université Paul-Valéry, Montpellier – EMMA)

[1] Ron Eyerman, Cultural Trauma: Slavery and the Formation of African American Identity, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2003.

[2] Christine Chivallon, « Mémoire de l’esclavage et actualisation des rapports sociaux, » in  Cottias, Myriam, Cunin, Elisabeth & de Almeida Mendes, Antόnio (eds.), Les esclavages et les traites. Perspectives historiques et contemporaines, Paris, Karthala, 2010, p. 335.

[3] Ira Berlin, « American Slavery in History and Memory and the Search for Social Justice, » The Journal of American History, 90.4 (2004), p. 1266-1267.

[4] Ana Lucia Araujo, Shadows of the Slave Past: Memory, Heritage, and Slavery, New York, Routledge, 2014, p. 77.

[5] Michael Rothberg, Multidirectional Memory: Remembering the Holocaust in the Age of Decolonization, Stanford, California, Stanford University Press, 2009.

[6] Max Silverman, Palimpsestic Memory: The Holocaust and Colonialism in French and Francophone Fiction and Film, New York, Berghahn Books, 2013.

CFP Traces et mémoires dec 2016

__________________________________________________________________________________________

Traces and Memories of Slavery in the Atlantic World

University of Montpellier, France

1-2 December, 2016

Keynote Speakers
Ana Lucia Araujo (Howard University)
Christine Chivallon (Research Director, CNRS)

In Cultural Trauma: Slavery and the Formation of African American Identity (2001),[1] Ron Eyerman explores the formation of African American identity through the cultural trauma of slavery. While trauma directly affected individuals who experienced slavery, Eyerman argues that, as a cultural process, trauma is « mediated through various forms of representation and linked to the reformation of collective identity and the reworking of collective memory ». This international conference seeks to examine the foundation, the mechanisms and the scope of these memorial processes. It endeavors to explore a reality of slavery that rests on human memory, on a (re)constructed memory of individual, collective or family trajectories and migrations transmitted from generation to generation.

The Traces and Memories of Slavery in the Atlantic World conference sets out to interrogate how descendants reconstruct the history of their ancestors when transatlantic slavery is one of the variables of the memorial process. The conference also aims at examining the extent to which, by a process of collectivization of personal or family memories and (hi)stories, social actors of the present not only partake in generating and consolidating group identities but also how they foster « the emergence of the memory of slavery in public space. »[2] In addition to assessing the cultural and symbolic redistribution which are enabled by the commemoration, the museification and the patrimonialization of the memory of slavery, this conference aims at probing the constraints which determine the inscription of this memory in the public sphere and the extent to which social demand, especially in the context of the obligation of remembrance, influences the production of historical knowledge and sometimes leads to conflicts of memory.

As Ira Berlin has argued, can it be contended that although « [h]istory and memory both speak to the subject of slavery […] they speak in different tongues » ?[3] In the traumatic and post-traumatic context of slavery, conflicting memories of interracial relationships, for instance, call for a specific attention: can the mechanisms of memorial (re)construction, whether it be from a psychological or historical point of view, claim or aim to be neutral? It will prove interesting to study the historical and strategic importance of places like Gorée – their symbolic and affective charge, as well as their memorial function. In the same vein, instances of what Ana Lucia Araujo refers to as « memory replacement », whereby « a local population appropriates an existing building or site and assigns to it stories of the Atlantic slave trade and slavery as if it was an actual heritage site » will also be worth considering.[4]

The organizing committee of this international and interdisciplinary conference welcomes papers in the form of case studies, analyses aimed at identifying general trends or comparative approaches. The geographic scope of the conference – the Atlantic space – is purposefully broad, as the issue of memorial modernity transcends individuals, race, nations, space and time. As memory of facts dating back to several generations can only be transmitted, reconstructed and inevitably fragmentary in nature, the palimpsestic dimension of the memorial process will be given particular attention.

Papers may build on recent theoretical works on memory, such as those of Michael Rothberg (2009)[5] for whom memory is constructed on the basis of multidirectional focalizations and synergies between events that are seemingly disconnected in time and space (Multidirectional Memory), or of Max Silverman (2013)[6] who has described the relationship between past and present in the form of a « superposition and interaction of different temporal traces [that] constitute a sort of composite structure, like a palimpsest, so that one layer of traces can be seen through, and is transformed by another » (Palimpsestic Memory). It might prove interesting to unravel the threads of family memory construction by studying the trajectory of founding individuals. The archival traces of key moments will thus be identified in order to interrogate and retrace the historical context of these trajectories and/or shed light on parallel trajectories, such as those of better-known historical figures. Genealogical research offers a propitious ground to retrace memories as genealogy reveals the memorial mechanisms which allow to recreate, from the interstices left by factual elements, decipherable paths which are historically credible and psychologically acceptable. Finally, it will be interesting to assess whether the memorial prism is necessarily ethnocentric.

The themes this conference endeavors to explore include, but are not limited to:
– the history and memory of slavery;
– the memorialization of slavery;
– the canonization of the memory of slavery;
– representation(s) of slavery;
– the commemoration, the museification and the patrimonialization of the memory of slavery;
– places and conditions of the production of knowledge on slavery and its circulation;
– the legacy/cies of slavery and the (re)construction of (collective) identity;
– slavery and genealogy;
– sources and archives on slavery.

Submission guidelines
The languages of the conference are English and French. Please send proposals of no more than 300 words in English or French (for papers or panels) and a brief CV mentioning your institutional affiliation to traces2016@gmail.com by February 29, 2016. Notification of acceptance will be sent by March 31, 2016. We welcome papers that cover any region of the Atlantic World as well as proposals for round table discussions.

Conference Organizers:
Lawrence Aje (Université Paul-Valéry, Montpellier – EMMA)
Nicolas Gachon (Université Paul-Valéry, Montpellier – EMMA)

[1] Ron Eyerman, Cultural Trauma: Slavery and the Formation of African American Identity, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2003.

[2] Christine Chivallon, « Mémoire de l’esclavage et actualisation des rapports sociaux, » in Cottias, Myriam, Cunin, Elisabeth & de Almeida Mendes, Antόnio (eds.), Les esclavages et les traites. Perspectives historiques et contemporaines, Paris, Karthala, 2010, p. 335.

[3] Ira Berlin, « American Slavery in History and Memory and the Search for Social Justice, » The Journal of American History, 90.4 (2004), p. 1266-1267.

[4] Ana Lucia Araujo, Shadows of the Slave Past: Memory, Heritage, and Slavery, New York, Routledge, 2014, p. 77.

[5] Michael Rothberg, Multidirectional Memory: Remembering the Holocaust in the Age of Decolonization, Stanford, California, Stanford University Press, 2009.

[6] Max Silverman, Palimpsestic Memory: The Holocaust and Colonialism in French and Francophone Fiction and Film, New York, Berghahn Books, 2013.

CFP Traces and Memories Dec 2016

_________________________________________________________________________________________

L’émancipation des travailleurs non-libres dans les Amériques avant l’abolition de l’esclavage

Université Paul Valéry – Montpellier III

vendredi 7 octobre 2016

Dans la continuité d’une première rencontre qui portait sur la codification juridique du travail contraint, cette journée d’étude souhaite examiner la pratique de l’émancipation des travailleurs non-libres dans les Amériques avant l’abolition de l’esclavage. L’émancipation est un acte juridique qui libère un individu de l’autorité d’un maître. Si l’émancipation est théoriquement de droit pour l’engagé car elle figure dans la majorité des contrats, elle constitue un privilège pour les esclaves dont la durée de service est à perpétuité et transmise de façon héréditaire. Ainsi, pour les travailleurs contraints, les modalités d’accession au statut de personne libre font l’objet d’une réglementation juridique et contractuelle qui varie selon les lieux et les époques. En effet, que ce soit au terme de l’expiration de leur contrat ou de leur peine, par un acte de libération anticipée, par le rachat, par émancipation testamentaire ou par des moyens plus inhabituels, tels le concubinage, les recours juridiques ou la fuite, les voies de la liberté pour la population servile sont multiples. Souvent utilisée comme un instrument de contrôle des travailleurs non-libres, l’émancipation est parfois porteuse de tensions sociales, notamment lorsqu’elle permet la croissance de la population de couleur libre dans des sociétés esclavagistes organisées selon une structure socio-raciale binaire.

Quelles sont les modalités de l’émancipation des travailleurs non-libres ? Quels facteurs motivent l’adoption de législations concernant l’émancipation ? Peut-on établir une typologie des maîtres émancipateurs de même que des esclaves émancipés ? Dans quelle mesure les esclaves et les engagés sont-ils acteurs de leur libération ? L’introduction de l’esclavage contribue-t-il à donner un pouvoir de négociation aux serviteurs blancs, notamment dans la réduction de leur temps de service ?  Assiste-t-on à une évolution de la pratique de l’émancipation en réaction à la montée de l’abolitionnisme, de ses succès, mais également de sa radicalisation ? Quels sont les enjeux sociaux, politiques, économiques et de sécurité publique posés par la pratique de l’émancipation ? Comment les maîtres accompagnent-ils leurs travailleurs non-libres vers la condition juridique de personne libre ? Les raisons qui favorisent les émancipations, de même que l’origine servile, raciale ou nationale des bénéficiaires, influent-t-elles sur la future intégration et ascension sociales des serviteurs libérés et des esclaves affranchis ?

***

Modalités de soumission
Les langues de la journée d’étude sont l’anglais et le français. Les propositions de communication, d’environ 300 mots, incluant un titre et le rattachement institutionnel, ainsi qu’une courte biographie, sont à envoyer à l’adresse suivante  2016emancipation@gmail avant le 1er juin 2016.
Une sélection des communications sera publiée.

Comité d’organisation :
Lawrence Aje (Université Paul -Valéry, Montpellier 3 – EMMA)
Anne-Claire Fauquez (Université Panthéon – Assas – EA 1569: Transferts critiques et dynamiques des savoirs, Université Paris VIII)
Elodie Peyrol-Kleiber (Université de Poitiers – MIMMOC)

CFP Emancipation

_________________________________________________________________________________________

Call for papers
Cognition Verbs: modality, evidentiality and constructions
Friday 15th April 2016, at Ecole Normale Supérieure – 45 rue d’Ulm 75005 Paris

Organised by Eric Melac (Université de Montpellier 3 – EMMA)
LaTTiCe-CNRS UMR8094

Coordinated by Myriam Bouveret – Projet ENS Labex Transfers

Keynote Speaker: Jan Nuyts (University of Antwerp)

The emergence of cognition verbs in a language might be one of the first symptoms of meta-cognitive reasoning (Recanati 2000, Sperber 2000). These verbs are involved in a variety of complex constructions, which partly mirror the intricate interaction between language and thought. Investigating cognition verbs from a scientific perspective enables us to understand how we stage our own ideas, and how linguistic forms encode our attitudes toward the conceptual worlds of others. Urmson (1952) reinvestigated the philosophical and linguistic questions these verbs raise, and Nuyts (2001) proposed to distinguish two types of meaning: the qualificational and non-qualificational uses. The latter use refers to the mental state indicated by the verb, whereas the former is an expression of the speaker’s stance. Phrases such as I think are extremely common in English, but its subtle meaning can only be fully understood if we take into account the pragmatic and discursive levels of language. This has led scholars to adopt a variety of methods – parallel corpus research, discourse analysis, statistical research – in order to shed light on the ever-evolving behaviour of these verbs (Aijmer 1997, Kaltenböck 2009, Kärkäinnen 2003, Dehé & Wichmann 2010, and Krawczak & Glynn 2011 inter alia).

This workshop will delve into the intricacies of cognition verbs from a cross-linguistic perspective. We will analyse the near-synonymity of phrases such as I think, I believe, I guess, I suppose, I imagine and I assume. We will explore the challenge they pose to semantic analysis, and their ambiguous modal and evidential status (Gosselin 2014). We will try to explain what motivates this evolution pattern (Cappelli 2007 and Melac 2014), and describe further the processes of grammaticalisation and cooptation that are at stake (Heine 2013). Finally, we will investigate whether the phenomena surrounding the use of cognition verbs in English are relevant cross-linguistically by looking at the data from a sample of languages.

Call for Papers
Authors are invited to submit contributions in English or French based on their personal research on cognition verbs and the questions confronted in the workshop presentation. Their abstracts will be evaluated by two members of the scientific committee.

– The abstract should be anonymous
– The abstract should be no longer than 2 pages including references (word or PDF format)
– The abstract should specify clearly the research question, the methodology and some of the results
– The email should contain the title of the abstract, 5 keywords, the name of the author and their affiliation
– Please submit the abstract to eric.melac@univ-montp3.fr

Scientific Committee Jacques Brès (Montpellier 3), Eric Corre (Paris 3), Dylan Glynn (Paris 8), Eric Mélac (Montpellier 3) and Debra Ziegeler (Paris 3).

Dates
Workshop 15th April 2016 (at ENS-Ulm)
Submission 25th February 2016
Notification 5th March 2016

Registration and Attendance
The attendance to the workshop is free for anyone. No registration required.

_________________________________________________________________________________________

Call for papers
Annual Conference of the Société d’Études Anglaises Contemporaines (SEAC)
University Paul-Valéry Montpellier 3-EMMA
21-22 October 2016

Bare lives: dispossession and exposure

Keynote speaker: Stephen Ross (University of Victoria, BC, Canada)

In the wake of the 2014 autumn conference of the SEAC (“State of Britain”) and building up on the findings of the 2015 LOL conference and particularly its developments on satire, we aim to extend our reflections on British modernist and contemporary literature and arts, addressing their aesthetics, ethics and politics.

Interrogating bare lives in terms of dispossession and exposure is a way to position our debate at the crossroads of various critical and theoretical approaches. “Bare lives” may well be taken as referring to Giorgio Agamben’s concept of bare life and can orientate our research towards modes of presentation and representation of biopolitics in contemporary production, as apparent in the works of such artists as Jeremy Deller and Mark Wallinger or such novelists as Jon McGregor. The theme of the conference can also be understood as an invitation to think about topics recently brought to the fore by precarity or precariousness studies, illustrated by Judith Butler or, on this side of the Atlantic, by philosopher Guillaume Le Blanc, among others. This might lead us to envisage the shift from precarity, poverty or other forms of exclusion (or blindness to exclusion) once depicted from an insider’s point of view by George Orwell in Down and Out in Paris and London, towards various other forms of dispossession, notoriously defined by Judith Butler and Athena Athanasiou and at work in many contemporary productions.

Bare lives, in so far as they may send us back to various forms of exposure—anthropological, social, cultural or economic—may direct the reader’s or spectator’s attention to how norms of visibility are shaped, assigned and implemented, and point to how invisible, voiceless, marginal groups and people, whose very lives are ignored or nearly so, are retrieved from invisibility. This is what British narratives of the 20th and 21st centuries have been doing, from Joyce’s Dubliners, Arnold Bennett’s last novels or Rebecca West’s first ones to Philip Larkin’s poems; from Forster’s Howards End to The Other Hand by Chris Cleave, from Samuel Beckett or Harold Pinter to Sarah Kane or Martin Crimp, not to mention the Angry Young Men, whose work stands in need of reappraisal. Cinema, for example the free cinema of the late 1950s and early 1960s and a great part of the documentary tradition, visual arts and literature engage with “small lives” (Le Blanc), interrogate humble genres and forms, such as life narratives or (auto)biographies, bare style, modes of writing that may resort, in their drive for sincerity, to the baring devices defined by the Russian formalists and implemented in metafictional production. Unless dispossession and exposure favour excess and other modes of outrage, or the collaboration of minimalism and excess.

Organising committee: A. Arniac, S. Belluc, I. Brasme, J-M. Ganteau, A. Haffen, L. Haghshenas, L. Petit, A. Privat, C. Reynier, T. Terradillos.
Proposals in English of about 300 words should be sent to Jean-Michel Ganteau (jean-michel.ganteau@univ-montp3.fr) and Christine Reynier (christine.reynier@univ-montp3.fr) by June 25, 2016.

Websites: http://www.laseac.fr/
and http://pays-anglophones.upv.univ-montp3.fr/

Appel à communications
Colloque annuel de la Société d’Études Anglaises Contemporaines (SEAC)
Université Paul-Valéry Montpellier 3-EMMA
21-22 octobre 2016

Dénuement et dénudement

Conférence plénière : Stephen Ross (University of Victoria, BC, Canada)

Dans le prolongement du colloque de l’automne 2014 de la SEAC consacré à « State of Britain », et à la suite du colloque LOL, particulièrement des travaux consacrés à la satire, nous nous proposons de continuer à nous intéresser à des problématiques de nature à faire se croiser les aspects esthétiques, mais aussi éthiques et politiques de la littérature et des arts britanniques modernistes et contemporains. S’interroger sur dénuement et dénudement permet de se situer d’emblée au carrefour de divers courants critiques et théoriques. L’invitation à penser le dénuement et le dénudement est certes une forme de clin d’œil à la vie nue de Giorgio Agamben et pourra permettre d’orienter nos investigations en direction des modes de présentation et de représentation de la biopolitique dans la production contemporaine, dans la veine des travaux de plasticiens tels Jeremy Deller et Mark Wallinger, ou encore de romanciers comme Jon McGregor. De même, l’intitulé du colloque peut s’entendre comme appel à s’interroger sur des problématiques récemment mises au goût du jour par les tenants des precarity ou precariousness studies, parmi lesquels Judith Butler, mais aussi, de ce côté de l’Atlantique, le philosophe Guillaume Le Blanc, entre autres. De la précarité à la pauvreté ou autres formes de non perception ou d’exclusion, jadis dépeinte de l’intérieur par George Orwell dans Down and Out in Paris and London, par exemple, peut s’esquisser un glissement vers les diverses formes de la dépossession telles que les envisagent Judith Butler et Athena Athanasiou, et telles qu’elles sont à l’œuvre dans une grande partie de la production contemporaine. Dénuement et dénudement, dans leur renvoi à diverses formes d’exposition anthropologique, sociale, culturelle ou économique, permettent d’attirer l’attention du lecteur et du public vers la fabrication et la mise en œuvre de normes de visibilité et mettent en lumière des populations et groupes invisibles, silencieux, exclus, dont l’existence publique est en mal de validation, (comme c’est le cas dans de nombreux récits britanniques des XXe et XXIe siècles, de Dubliners de Joyce et des derniers romans de Arnold Bennett, ou encore des premiers de Rebecca West, à la poésie de Philip Larkin, du Howards End de Forster au The Other Hand de Chris Cleave, de Samuel Beckett ou Harold Pinter à Sarah Kane ou Martin Crimp en passant par l’œuvre des romanciers et dramaturges de la colère, en mal de ré-évaluation en cette deuxième décennie du XXIe siècle). C’est à une attention aux « vies minuscules » (Le Blanc) que le cinéma (notamment, mais pas exclusivement, le free cinema de la fin des années 50 et du début des années 60, mais aussi la tradition documentaire), les arts visuels et la littérature britannique nous convient, nous permettant de nous interroger sur des genres ou formes humbles (récits de vie, (auto)biographie), sur le dépouillement du style et de la structure, le dénuement de l’écriture qui, dans des effets de sincérité accusés, s’expriment en « dénudation du procédé » chère aux travaux des formalistes russes et aux expérimentations métafictionnelles. A moins que le dénuement et le dénudement ne passent par l’excès, et autres formes d’outrage, ou par le minimalisme et l’excès.

Comité d’organisation : A. Arniac, S. Belluc, I. Brasme, J-M. Ganteau, A. Haffen, L. Haghshenas, L. Petit, A. Privat, C. Reynier, T. Terradillos.

Les propositions en anglais d’environ 300 mots sont à envoyer à Jean-Michel Ganteau (jean-michel.ganteau@univ-montp3.fr) et Christine Reynier (christine.reynier@univ-montp3.fr) avant le 25 juin 2016.

Retrouvez ces informations sur : http://www.laseac.fr/
Et http://pays-anglophones.upv.univ-montp3.fr/

CFP SEAC Montpellier 2016

_________________________________________________________________________________________

Traces et mémoires de l’esclavage dans l’espace atlantique
 Université Paul Valéry,
Montpellier, France
1-2 décembre 2016

Conférencières plénières
Ana Lucia Araujo (Howard University)
Christine Chivallon (Directrice de recherche LAM-CNRS)

Dans Cultural Trauma: Slavery and the Formation of African American Identity (2001)[1], Ron Eyerman explore la formation de l’identité africaine américaine à travers le traumatisme culturel de l’esclavage. Au-delà de son impact direct sur celles et ceux qui ont subi l’esclavage, Eyerman considère qu’en tant que processus culturel, le traumatisme est « transmis par l’intermédiaire de diverses formes de représentation et associé à la formation d’une identité et à la construction d’une mémoire collectives ». Cette conférence internationale cherche à examiner les fondements, les mécanismes et l’étendue de ces processus mémoriels. Il s’agira d’explorer une réalité de l’esclavage adossée à la mémoire humaine, à la (re)construction de la mémoire de trajectoires et de migrations individuelles, collectives ou familiales transmises de génération en génération.

La conférence Traces et Mémoires de l’Esclavage dans l’Espace Atlantique se propose d’interroger la façon dont les descendants reconstruisent l’histoire de leurs ancêtres dès lors que l’esclavage pratiqué dans le cadre de la traite transatlantique figure parmi les paramètres du processus mémoriel. Elle entend également analyser comment, par un processus de collectivisation de mémoires et d’histoires personnelles ou familiales, les acteurs sociaux du présent contribuent non seulement à générer et à consolider des identités de groupes mais également à favoriser « l’émergence de la mémoire de l’esclavage dans l’espace public »[2]. Outre la redistribution culturelle et symbolique que peuvent suggérer des phénomènes de commémoration, de muséification et de patrimonialisation de la mémoire de l’esclavage, cette conférence souhaite également observer les contraintes que suppose son insertion dans l’espace public en analysant combien la demande sociale, notamment dans le cadre de revendications de devoirs de mémoire, influence la production de la connaissance historique et donne parfois lieu à des conflits de mémoires.

Peut-on affirmer avec Ira Berlin que « l’histoire et la mémoire interrogent toutes deux la question de l’esclavage […] mais qu’elles le font dans des langues différentes »?[3] Dans le contexte traumatique et post-traumatique de l’esclavage, la question des métissages et des souffrances qui les entourent parfois appelle un examen spécifique : les mécanismes de (re)construction mémorielle peuvent-ils, que ce soit d’un point de vue psychologique ou historique, prétendre à la neutralité ? Est-ce là leur vocation ? L’importance historique et stratégique de Gorée, sa charge symbolique et émotionnelle, et sa fonction mémorielle s’insèreront utilement dans la réflexion. Dans la même veine, des exemples de ce qu’Ana Lucia Araujo qualifie de « re(m)placement mémoriel », un processus selon lequel « une population locale s’approprie un bâtiment ou un site existant et attribue un passé lié à la traite atlantique et à l’esclavage, comme s’il s’agissait d’un véritable site historique, »[4] pourront être pris en considération.

Cette conférence internationale et pluridisciplinaire invite des communications en forme d’études de cas précis, d’analyses visant à dégager des constantes générales et des travaux comparatifs. Le champ géographique retenu englobe la totalité de l’espace atlantique, non pas pour privilégier des travaux sur les interactions entre servitude et capitalisme mais dans le sens où cette modernité-là, modernité mémorielle, transcende les individus, les « races », les nations, l’espace et le temps. Le champ géographique est donc large à dessein. Parce que la mémoire de faits remontant à plusieurs générations ne peut être que parcellaire, transmise et reconstruite, les lignes de force signifiantes du processus mémoriel feront l’objet d’une attention particulière.

La réflexion pourra se nourrir de travaux théoriques récents, dont ceux de Michael Rothberg[5] (2009) pour qui la mémoire se construit sur la base de focalisations multidirectionnelles et de synergies entre des événements apparemment déconnectés dans le temps et dans l’espace (Multidirectional Memory), et de Max Silverman[6] (2013) qui s’intéresse notamment à la « condensation » de traces spatio-temporelles différentes et parfois disparates (Palimpsestic Memory). Il pourra être intéressant de démêler les fils de constructions mémorielles familiales en déconstruisant des trajectoires d’individus fondateurs. Les traces archivistiques de moments clés pourront ainsi être convoquées pour interroger et préciser le contexte historique de ces trajectoires et/ou pour éclairer des trajectoires parallèles, celles par exemple de personnages plus connus. La recherche généalogique offre un terrain propice à la confrontation entre traces et mémoire, à la mise en exergue des mécanismes qui permettent de recréer des parcours déchiffrables, historiquement crédibles et psychologiquement acceptables dans les interstices laissés par les éléments factuels transmis par les générations. La question de la facture presque nécessairement ethnocentrique du prisme mémoriel pourra également être visitée.

Les participants pourront s’interroger sur les pistes, non exhaustives, de réflexion suivantes : 
– l’histoire et la mémoire de l’esclavage ;
– la mémorialisation de l’esclavage ;
– la canonisation de la mémoire de l’esclavage ;
– la/es représentation(s) de l’esclavage ;
– la commémoration, la muséification et la patrimonialisation de la mémoire de l’esclavage ;
– les lieux et les conditions de production et de circulation de savoirs sur l’esclavage ;
– l’héritage/les héritages de l’esclavage et la (re)construction d’une identité (collective);
– l’esclavage et la généalogie ;
– les sources et les archives sur l’esclavage.

Modalités de soumission :
Les langues de la conférence sont l’anglais et le français. Les propositions de 300 mots maximum, incluant un titre et le rattachement institutionnel, ainsi qu’une courte biographie sont à envoyer à traces2016@gmail.com avant le 29 février 2016. Les auteur(e)s de propositions acceptées seront informé(e)s le 31 mars 2016. Les propositions couvrant la totalité de l’espace atlantique sont bienvenues, ainsi que les propositions de tables rondes.

Comité d’organisation :
Lawrence Aje (Université Paul-Valéry, Montpellier – EMMA)
Nicolas Gachon (Université Paul-Valéry, Montpellier – EMMA)

Traces and Memories of Slavery in the Atlantic World
University of Montpellier, France
1-2 December, 2016

Keynote Speakers
Ana Lucia Araujo (Howard University)
Christine Chivallon (Research Director, CNRS)

In Cultural Trauma: Slavery and the Formation of African American Identity (2001),[7] Ron Eyerman explores the formation of African American identity through the cultural trauma of slavery. While trauma directly affected individuals who experienced slavery, Eyerman argues that, as a cultural process, trauma is « mediated through various forms of representation and linked to the reformation of collective identity and the reworking of collective memory ». This international conference seeks to examine the foundation, the mechanisms and the scope of these memorial processes. It endeavors to explore a reality of slavery that rests on human memory, on a (re)constructed memory of individual, collective or family trajectories and migrations transmitted from generation to generation.

The Traces and Memories of Slavery in the Atlantic World conference sets out to interrogate how descendants reconstruct the history of their ancestors when transatlantic slavery is one of the variables of the memorial process. The conference also aims at examining the extent to which, by a process of collectivization of personal or family memories and (hi)stories, social actors of the present not only partake in generating and consolidating group identities but also how they foster « the emergence of the memory of slavery in public space. »[8] In addition to assessing the cultural and symbolic redistribution which are enabled by the commemoration, the museification and the patrimonialization of the memory of slavery, this conference aims at probing the constraints which determine the inscription of this memory in the public sphere and the extent to which social demand, especially in the context of the obligation of remembrance, influences the production of historical knowledge and sometimes leads to conflicts of memory.

As Ira Berlin has argued, can it be contended that although « [h]istory and memory both speak to the subject of slavery […] they speak in different tongues » ?[9] In the traumatic and post-traumatic context of slavery, conflicting memories of interracial relationships, for instance, call for a specific attention: can the mechanisms of memorial (re)construction, whether it be from a psychological or historical point of view, claim or aim to be neutral? It will prove interesting to study the historical and strategic importance of places like Gorée – their symbolic and affective charge, as well as their memorial function. In the same vein, instances of what Ana Lucia Araujo refers to as « memory replacement », whereby « a local population appropriates an existing building or site and assigns to it stories of the Atlantic slave trade and slavery as if it was an actual heritage site » will also be worth considering.[10]

The organizing committee of this international and interdisciplinary conference welcomes papers in the form of case studies, analyses aimed at identifying general trends or comparative approaches. The geographic scope of the conference – the Atlantic space – is purposefully broad, as the issue of memorial modernity transcends individuals, race, nations, space and time. As memory of facts dating back to several generations can only be transmitted, reconstructed and inevitably fragmentary in nature, the palimpsestic dimension of the memorial process will be given particular attention.

Papers may build on recent theoretical works on memory, such as those of Michael Rothberg (2009) [11] for whom memory is constructed on the basis of multidirectional focalizations and synergies between events that are seemingly disconnected in time and space (Multidirectional Memory), or of Max Silverman (2013) [12] who has described the relationship between past and present in the form of a « superposition and interaction of different temporal traces [that] constitute a sort of composite structure, like a palimpsest, so that one layer of traces can be seen through, and is transformed by another » (Palimpsestic Memory). It might prove interesting to unravel the threads of family memory construction by studying the trajectory of founding individuals. The archival traces of key moments will thus be identified in order to interrogate and retrace the historical context of these trajectories and/or shed light on parallel trajectories, such as those of better-known historical figures. Genealogical research offers a propitious ground to retrace memories as genealogy reveals the memorial mechanisms which allow to recreate, from the interstices left by factual elements, decipherable paths which are historically credible and psychologically acceptable. Finally, it will be interesting to assess whether the memorial prism is necessarily ethnocentric.

The themes this conference endeavors to explore include, but are not limited to:
– the history and memory of slavery;
– the memorialization of slavery;
– the canonization of the memory of slavery;
– representation(s) of slavery;
– the commemoration, the museification and the patrimonialization of the memory of slavery;
– places and conditions of the production of knowledge on slavery and its circulation;
– the legacy/cies of slavery and the (re)construction of (collective) identity;
– slavery and genealogy;
– sources and archives on slavery.

Submission guidelines
The languages of the conference are English and French. Please send proposals of no more than 300 words in English or French (for papers or panels) and a brief CV mentioning your institutional affiliation to traces2016@gmail.com by February 29, 2016. Notification of acceptance will be sent by March 31, 2016. We welcome papers that cover any region of the Atlantic World as well as proposals for round table discussions.

Conference Organizers:
Lawrence Aje (Université Paul-Valéry, Montpellier – EMMA)
Nicolas Gachon (Université Paul-Valéry, Montpellier – EMMA)

[1] Ron Eyerman, Cultural Trauma: Slavery and the Formation of African American Identity, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2003.
[2] Christine Chivallon, « Mémoire de l’esclavage et actualisation des rapports sociaux, » in  Cottias, Myriam, Cunin, Elisabeth & de Almeida Mendes, Antόnio (eds.), Les esclavages et les traites. Perspectives historiques et contemporaines, Paris, Karthala, 2010, p. 335.
[3] Ira Berlin, « American Slavery in History and Memory and the Search for Social Justice, » The Journal of American History, 90.4 (2004), p. 1266-1267.
[4] Ana Lucia Araujo, Shadows of the Slave Past: Memory, Heritage, and Slavery, New York, Routledge, 2014, p. 77.
[5] Michael Rothberg, Multidirectional Memory: Remembering the Holocaust in the Age of Decolonization, Stanford, California, Stanford University Press, 2009.
[6] Max Silverman, Palimpsestic Memory: The Holocaust and Colonialism in French and Francophone Fiction and Film, New York, Berghahn Books, 2013.
[7] Ron Eyerman, Cultural Trauma: Slavery and the Formation of African American Identity, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2003.
[8] Christine Chivallon, « Mémoire de l’esclavage et actualisation des rapports sociaux, » in Cottias, Myriam, Cunin, Elisabeth & de Almeida Mendes, Antόnio (eds.), Les esclavages et les traites. Perspectives historiques et contemporaines, Paris, Karthala, 2010, p. 335.
[9] Ira Berlin, « American Slavery in History and Memory and the Search for Social Justice, » The Journal of American History, 90.4 (2004), p. 1266-1267.
[10] Ana Lucia Araujo, Shadows of the Slave Past: Memory, Heritage, and Slavery, New York, Routledge, 2014, p. 77.
[11] Michael Rothberg, Multidirectional Memory: Remembering the Holocaust in the Age of Decolonization, Stanford, California, Stanford University Press, 2009.
[12] Max Silverman, Palimpsestic Memory: The Holocaust and Colonialism in French and Francophone Fiction and Film, New York, Berghahn Books, 2013.

_________________________________________________________________________________________

VIRGINIA WOOLF AND IMAGES: BECOMING PHOTOGRAPHIC
SEW International Conference, 30 juin-1er juillet 2016, Université de Toulouse 2

Organisation:
Adèle CASSIGNEUL (Bordeaux 2 University/CAS EA 801)
with Christine REYNIER (Montpellier 3 University)

Scientific Committe:
Frédérique AMSELLE (Valenciennes University)
Laurent MELLET (Toulouse 2 University)
Claire PÉGON (Paris 3 University)
Lauren ELKIN (American University of Paris)
Christine REYNIER (Montpellier 3 University)
Anne-Marie SMITH-DI BIASIO (Paris Catholic University)

Confirmed Guest Speaker: Maggie HUMM (East London University)

Deadline for submission: February 28th, 2016
Contact: becomingphotographic@outlook.com

What is the difference between a camera and the whooping-cough?
One makes facsimiles and the other makes sick families
Stephen children, Hyde Park Gate News vol. 1, n° 9, Monday, 6th April 1891

Virginia Stephen was nine when, with her sister Vanessa and her brother Thoby, she invented riddles and wrote regular chronicles involving photography in the family newspaper. She was still nine when, for Christmas, she drew successive ink vignettes which build up a “story not needing words” . Later, in 1906, while trying to depict “great melancholy moors”, she passionately penned in her diary: “But words! words! You will find nothing to match the picture” . For Woolf, be it through a malicious play on words, a lively succession of images or the expression of a young writer’s frustration, words and images are set in fruitful tension. The quotes mark out the intermedial interaction and emulation underling Woolfian prose, its becoming other.
It is now common knowledge in Woolfian studies that Woolf’s oeuvre enjoys intimate relations with the visual arts; Maggie Humm’s 2010 edition of The Edinburgh Companion to Virginia Woolf and the Arts has proved it admirably. Yet Frances Spalding’s 2014 exhibition at the National Portrait Gallery, “Virginia Woolf. Art, Life and Vision” blatantly showed that Woolf is still mainly related to Post-impressionism and to Bloomsbury pictorial influence. While Maggie Humm and Elena Gualtieri, among others, have brought to the fore the crucial part played by photography in Woolf’s life and cultural environment, there is nonetheless a need to focus on photographic intermediality and its textual effects in the oeuvre. This conference therefore intends to consider how, in its relation to photography, the plasticity of the Woolfian text actually becomes photographic and makes us see.

Thus taking its cue from the preceding SEW seminars and conferences – “Outlanding Woolf” in 2013, “Humble Woolf” in 2014 and “Trans-Woolf” in 2015 – this two-days symposium will explore multiple aspects of Virginia Woolf’s relation to photography.

1. VIRGINIA WOOLF AND IMAGES
One might return to Woolf’s rich family heritage, to what constitutes the studium (Barthes) of her knowledge and practice of photography, namely the work of Julia Margaret Cameron or Leslie Stephen’s 1895 Photograph Album, but also to what François Brunet calls the “Kodak revolution”. In the wake of Humm’s latest articles, these decisive influences might be analysed in relation to (auto)biography, diaristic writing, the need for self-expression and the private recording of daily life.
Between theory, amateurism and actual praxis, Woolf’s intimate relationship to photography might be brought to bear on contemporary French research into visual cultures, thus opening onto ethical as well as aesthetic debates. One might also focus on photography as a humble craft, that is, a “middlebrow” (Bourdieu) or “vernacular” (Chéroux) practice and a “conversational medium” (Ghuntert) which challenges literary writing.

2. BUILDING THE IMAGE/TEXT
Thanks to the Hogarth Press, Woolf printed illustrated books – iconotexts – and included photographs in some of her own productions (Orlando, Flush and Three Guineas). She also collected newspaper articles and press images for her 1930s scrapbooks. One might indeed analyse how the photographic image works in and with the text, how it acts as an actual rhetorical tool, actively contributing to building up the image-text.
One might also reflect on the punctum (Barthes) of Woolfian photographic style, in order to see how photographic visibility translates into words, either through the literal metaphors Woolf uses in both her essays and fiction or through the implicit ones which adapt the photographic process or album design into writing.

3. PHOTOGRAPHY’S INVISIBLE REVOLUTION (Ortel)
Another possible aspect of enquiry might be the photographic unconscious or photographic “third” (Louvel). This could be linked to questions of representation (realism, phenomenology), of perception (optical or mental, the mind’s eye), and of traces (photographic memory, history, haunting in relation to Georges Didi-Huberman’s work).
Last but not least, it would be interesting to try and circumscribe Woolf’s imaginary museum, to delve into her connections with 19th- and 20th-century photographic aesthetics such as Pictorialism, the Kodak snapshot or the 1910s-1920s avant-garde.

CFP Becoming Photographic

_________________________________________________________________________________________

Call for papers
ESSE Conference in Galway, Ireland,
Monday 22 August – Friday 26 August 2016. 
http://www.essenglish.org/

Seminar
Modernist Non-fictional Narratives of Modernism

The aim of the seminar will be to focus on the non-fictional writings – essays, diaries, letters, etc. – of the modernist period by canonical writers or less famous ones and to explore the way in which they construct modernism. Are the paradigms they shape the same as those now regarded as modernist paradigms – the ordinary, the unspectacular; the event, etc. What version do they give of them? What other paradigms do they put forward? What narratives do these modernist non-fictional writings provide of modernism and how do they compare with the narratives of modernism provided by critical theory?

Individual proposals should be sent to the two conveners:
– David Bradshaw, Worcester College, Oxford University, UK
david.bradshaw@worc.ox.ac.uk
and
– Christine Reynier, University Paul-Valéry Montpellier3-EMMA, France
christine.reynier@univ-montp3.fr
by 28 February 2016.

_________________________________________________________________________________________

Journée d’étude d’EMMA vendredi 27 mai 2016
La voix narrative dans le théâtre et le cinéma anglophones des XXe et XXIe siècles

Les arts dramatiques comme le théâtre et le cinéma fonctionnent selon le principe de la double énonciation (Übersfeld): le point de vue et les pensées des personnages représentent la première de ces énonciations , le point de vue du metteur en scène ou du cinéaste, représente la seconde ; la première est par définition multiple dans la mesure où une pièce ou un film fait figurer, la plupart du temps, plusieurs personnages , la seconde est plus allusive et élusive, parfois sujette à controverse puisqu’elle est moins clairement énoncée. Cette ambiguïté potentielle peut parfois créer des malentendus entre un dramaturge ou un metteur en scène et son public, surtout lorsqu’il s’agit de mœurs ou de politique.

Conscients de cette difficulté commune au théâtre et au cinéma, les artistes contemporains (romanciers, dramaturges, scénaristes et metteurs en scène) ont souvent exploré de façon plus libre les différentes manières de présenter et représenter la narration et le narrateur, se jouant parfois volontairement de cette ambiguïté même, et inventant des situations d’énonciation nouvelles. Cette journée d’étude se propose d’explorer ce qu’il advient de cette voix narrative dans les deux moyens d’expression dramatique que sont le théâtre et le cinéma.

La voix narrative homodiégétique au cinéma
Dans le cas du cinéma il s’agira de se concentrer sur la voix homodiégétique, celle qui dans le roman dont le film est l’adaptation dirige à la fois récit et point de vue, narration et focalisation. En littérature, une voix homodiégétique se doit d’être constante et restreinte par la conscience du personnage afin d’être crédible. L’équivalent cinématographique est grammaticalement plus flou, plus ambigu, plus versatile. Il s’agira de voir à travers différents cas de figure comment le film adapte cette voix narrative si particulière.

Les outils théoriques proposés sont ceux que Brian McFarlane utilise dans sa théorie de l’adaptation filmique (1996) empruntée à l’analyse structurale du récit de Barthes (1966) : fonctions distributionnelles et fonctions intégratives, et leurs deux sous-catégories : fonctions cardinales et catalyses d’une part, informants et indices d’autre part. Selon McFarlane, des quatre fonctions évoquées, seules les trois premières seraient transférables telles quelles dans le medium filmique, tandis que les indices seraient non transférables et nécessiteraient donc une adaptation au sens propre.

La voix narrative apparaît en première place parmi ces indices non transférables dans la mesure où toute la narration ne peut se transposer en voix off, notamment dans le cas d’une narration homodiégétique. Celle-ci se fait entendre au cinéma dans une voix off qui ne peut être qu’intermittente dans un film de fiction. D’autres moyens cinématographiques doivent être mis en œuvre et inventés : caméra subjective, composition des plans, et de façon plus générale la focalisation interne. Tous les éléments de mise en scène pourront être invoqués, qu’il s’agisse d’aspects temporels ou esthétiques (place de la caméra, angles de prise de vue, constance du personnage narrateur à l’écran, montage, musique, interprétation, etc.). Certains de ces moyens nécessitent d’être confrontés à la réalité des études de cas, ce qui devrait permettre d’affiner la théorie de McFarlane durant cette journée qui se concentrera sur les récits classiques, « à intrigue et à personnages » (Metz).

Bibliographie indicative:
Bordwell, David. Narration in the Fiction Film. London: Routledge, 1986.
Branigan, Edward. Narrative Comprehension and Film. London & New York: Routledge, 1992.
Cardwell, Sarah. Adaptation Revisited: Television and the Classic Novel. Manchester: Manchester UP, 2002
Cartmell, Deborah and Imelda Whelehan, The Cambridge Companion to Literature on Screen. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2007.
Chion, Michel. Un art sonore, le cinéma. Histoire, esthétique, poétique. Paris : Cahiers du cinéma, essais, 2003.
Jost, François & André Gaudreault. Cinéma et récit, II. Le récit cinématographique. Paris: Nathan, 1990.
Leitch, Thomas. Film Adaptation and Its Discontents – From Gone with the Wind to The Passion of the Christ. Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins UP, 2007.
McFarlane, Brian. Novel to Film : An Introduction to the Theory of Adaptation Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1996.
Mellet Laurent & Shannon Wells-Lassagne. Étudier l’adaptation filmique : cinéma anglais – cinéma américain. Rennes: PUR, 2010.
Mulvey, Laura. Visual and Other Pleasures. New York: Palgrave, 1989.
Stam, Robert and Allesandra Raengo. Literature and Film; A Guide to the Theory and Practice of Film Adaptation. Oxford: Blackwell, 2005.

Du roman au théâtre : que devient le narrateur ?
L’adaptation de romans est une pratique courante de la scène contemporaine, qu’elle soit le fait du romancier devenu dramaturge, ou d’un dramaturge adaptant le roman écrit par un autre, ou encore d’un metteur en scène s’inspirant d’un récit pour en faire un spectacle. D’après Muriel Plana, « [l]oin d’être un passage, associé à quelque malheureuse déperdition, d’une œuvre originelle vers une forme d’accueil, dans laquelle elle resterait reconnaissable, l’adaptation se présente comme une construction de médiations de plus en plus opaques entre une œuvre qu’on utilise comme matériau, comme point d’appui ou lieu d’inspiration, et une pratique théâtrale qui ne la reconnaît plus comme originelle. Le XIXe siècle adaptait. Le XXe siècle réécrit et recompose, au prix de l’éclatement de la matrice initiale – dût-elle se résumer à la fable d’un roman. »

Cette journée d’étude se propose d’explorer le passage du récit à la scène dans le théâtre anglophone du XXe et du XXIe siècles, en se concentrant plus particulièrement sur la voix narrative : qu’elle soit hétéro ou homodiégétique, prise en charge par un personnage, un acteur ou encore une voix désincarnée, équivalent de la voix-off au cinéma, l’instance narratrice est l’objet d’une réflexion nécessaire puisqu’elle représente la spécificité stylistique du roman. Alors que le théâtre contemporain s’affranchit bien souvent des distinctions de genre, l’inventivité des dramaturges et adaptateurs semble pouvoir se mesurer à leur capacité à prendre en charge la narration, à lui donner toute sa place, à lui créer un espace scénique spécifique, qui ne se limiterait pas aux didascalies mais serait effectivement mise en voix et en images.

Les propositions pourront concerner l’ensemble des pratiques d’adaptation du récit à la scène anglophone, mais aussi les créations transgénériques ou hybrides aux XXe et XXIe siècles.

Bibliographie
Aston, Elaine and George Savona. Theatre as Sign-System : A Semiotics of Text and Performance. London and New York : Routledge, 1991.
Brecht, Bertold. Ecrits sur le théâtre, tome 1. Paris : L’Arche, 1963-72.
Issacharoff, Michael. Le Spectacle du discours. Paris: J. Corti, 1985.
Jahn, Manfred. « Narrative Voice and Agency in Drama: Aspects of a Narratology of Drama ». New Literary History: A Journal of Theory and Interpretation 32, no 3 (Summer 2001): 659‑79.
Keir, Elam. The Semiotics of Theatre and Drama. London : Methuen, 1980.
Plana, Muriel. Roman, théâtre, cinéma au XXe siècle : adaptations, hybridations et dialogue des arts. Paris : Bréal, 2014.

Merci d’envoyer vos propositions de communications sous la forme d’abstract de 250 à 300 mots, en anglais ou en français, à Marianne Drugeon (marianne.drugeon@univ-montp3.fr) et Luc Bouvard (luc.bouvard@univ-montp3.fr) avant le 04 janvier 2016.

Seminar Friday 27 May 2016
The narrative voice in anglophone theatre and cinema in the 20th and 21st centuries.

Arts like theatre and cinema work, in the words of Anne Übersfeld, with a double enunciation: the viewpoint and thoughts of the characters are one of the enunciations, and it is by definition multiple insofar as a play or a film has, most of the time, more than one character; the viewpoint of the stage-director or film director is the second, which is more allusive, and elusive, and sometimes controversial for the very reason that it is less clearly formulated. This potential ambiguity may sometimes lead to misunderstandings between a playwright or a stage-director and the audience, all the more so when the work is political.

While conscious of this difficulty which is common to plays and films, 20th and 21century- artists (novelists, playwrights, film and stage-directors) have often delved into the potentialities of considering, presenting and representing narration and the narrative voice with much more freedom than their predecessors, sometimes consciously playing with that very ambiguity and always inventing new narrative situations. This seminar proposes to explore what becomes of this narrative voice in both theatre and cinema.

From the novel to the film: What becomes of the homodiegetic narrative voice?
As far as film is concerned, we shall focus on the homodiegetic voice in Genettian terms ie that which in the novel leads the narrative and imposes the point of view, associating narration and focalization together with character. In literature, a homodiegetic voice is meant to be constant and restricted to the conscience of the character-narrator-focaliser so as to preserve its credibility. The cinematic equivalent is grammatically more ambiguous and versatile. We shall endeavour to see through a series of case studies how film adapts this particular narrative voice.

Our theoretical tools will be borrowed from Brian McFarlane’s theory of adaptation (1996) which picks up from what Barthes had proposed in the field of literature : two main categories of functions (distributional and integrational), which can themselves be subdivided to include cardinal functions and catalysers on the one hand and informants and indices on the other. According to McFarlane, the first three are directly transferable from one medium to the other, while the indices could only be introduced into the adapting medium through adaptation proper. The narrative voice ranks first in the constellation of elements that compose the indices.

The homodiegetic voice systematically reminds its reader of the character whose thoughts, feelings and experiences it is supposed to convey. The literary homodiegetic voice may certainly be heard in a cinematic voiceover as well but it cannot be more than intermittent in a fiction film.

Other means must be implemented, invented so to speak, by the film medium: subjective camera, the composition of screen space, and more generally internal focalisation as redefined by McFarlane. The speakers may deal with as many aspects as they wish: temporal, linguistic, visual, musical elements or notions of editing. Some of these means require to be confronted with the reality of the case studies that will be proposed, which will allow us no doubt to further the discussion from McFarlane’s starting point. We shall limit our scope to the adaptation of narratives (short stories, novellas or novels) in the classical sense of the term (mostly Victorian or Edwardian).

From the novel to the stage : what becomes of the narrator ?
Adapting novels is a common enough practice on the contemporary stage, whether it is the creation of a novelist turned playwright, of a playwright who adapts the novel of another, or of a stage-director who found inspiration in a novel which he brought to the stage.

According to Muriel Plana, « far from merely turning an original work into another, and losing something in the process, adaptation is a complex construction made up of a series of intercessory mediations, and which is less and less penetrable, between a work of art which is seen as the material, the support or the source of inspiration, and theatrical practice which does not recognize it as original anymore. The 19th century artists adapted works, the 20th century artists rewrite them, reconstruct them, and the original work, which may be reduced to the storyline of the novel, bursts in the process.” (Our translation).

This seminar aims at exploring the passage from the novel, the story, to the stage in anglophone theatre in the 20th and 21st centuries, concentrating more particularly on the narrative voice: be it hetero or homodiegetic, taken charge of by a character, an actor or a disembodied voice, which may be see as the equivalent of the voice-over in a film, the narrative voice is the stylistic specificity of the novel and, as such, is necessarily the object of deep concern. While contemporary theatre often frees itself from generic distinctions, adapters, playwrights and stage-directors show their ingenuity in the way they take on the narrative voice, giving it room, creating a specific stage space for it, which is not limited to stage directions but can effectively be heard and seen on stage.

Proposals may concern all kinds of adaptations from novels to plays, but also hybrid or transgeneric creations.

Please send all proposals (between 250 and 300 words), in English or in French, to Marianne Drugeon (marianne.drugeon@univ-montp3.fr) and Luc Bouvard (luc.bouvard@univ-montp3.fr) by January 4th 2016.

_________________________________________________________________________________________

International D.H. Lawrence Conference St Ives Cornwall 12-14 September 2016

“Outside England…Far off from the world”: D.H. Lawrence, Cornwall and Regional Modernism

Organised in association with the University of Exeter Penryn Campus, this conference will be held at the Tregenna Castle Hotel St Ives to commemorate the centenary of D.H. Lawrence’s move to the nearby village of Zennor.

 In the midst of the Great War, Lawrence arrived in Zennor following a brief stay in Porthcothan in North Cornwall. His description of Porthcothan as “Outside England…Far off from the world” shows the impression this place made on his imagination, but his reaction to Zennor was even more remarkable: “When we came over the shoulder of the wild hill, above the sea, to Zennor, I felt we were coming into the Promised Land. I know there will a new heaven and a new earth take place now: we have triumphed…this isn’t merely territory, it is a new continent of the soul”. 

In seeking to highlight the significance of Lawrence’s fascination with Cornwall, this conference will use his response to that place as a way into looking at broader issues in his work and, more widely, the position of place in British modernism. In the context of Lawrence’s utterances about the Midlands, which have attracted much critical attention, it will probe Lawrence’s use of the term “outside England” to describe his response to Cornwall that, by comparison, has been largely overlooked.  Whilst this conference seeks to bring together scholars and postgraduates to focus on the role of place in the work of D.H. Lawrence, it will also consider the significance of peripherality and localism, creative responses to marginalisation, the expression of disparities between imagined and familiar locations and the legacy of pastoral experience in modernist literature. In interrogating these ideas, it intends to contribute to broader discussions about the complex and interrelated relationship between place and the literary imagination.

Whilst we particularly welcome abstracts that consider all aspects of D.H. Lawrence’s—often fluctuating—responses to place, either pastoral or city and especially to Cornwall, we also invite papers on other related topics that focus on the significance of place in the modernist period, which may include but are not limited to;
Consideration of how perceptions of particular places can alter in reaction to traumatic events such as war
– The construction of place as the Other
Differences between literary interpretations of place and the lived experience of the inhabitants of that place 
The conflict between the pastoral and the city in modernist experience and writing
The impact of outsiders into rural communities
Groupings of literary, political or cultural figures that were encouraged by specific locations or any consequences of these associations
The relationship between place and the literary form
The tensions between class/race/gender and pastoral/city places
Literary interpretations of the connections between history and place
The relevance of place in attempts to find a more hopeful future

Please send abstracts of no more than 300 words for proposed 25 minute papers to
dhlcornwall@btinternet.com

cfp deadline: 1 December 2015  successful applicants will be notified by 1 February 2016. 

There will be an opportunity for selected papers to be published in a special conference edition of the journal of the D.H. Lawrence Society.

The conference will be held at the Tregenna Castle Hotel St Ives which is within walking distance of this artistically alluring seaside town that Lawrence knew well. St Ives can be reached by train from London Paddington (changing at St Erth).

Further information regarding the conference is available at:
www.lawrencecornwall.wix.com/conference

_________________________________________________________________________________________

Les inférences dans la communication orale en L2 :
processus et marques linguistiques
Montpellier, France
12 – 13 Mai, 2016

« La parole est moitié à celui qui parle, moitié à celui qui l’écoute […]. »[1]
(Montaigne, Les Essais 3, Chap. 13, p. 1088)
Selon D. Bailly (1998 : 132)[2], l’inférence est « une opération de raisonnement logique par laquelle, à partir d’un fait, d’une proposition…, on tire une conséquence ».

Dans le cadre de la communication orale, cette opération participe de la construction de l’interaction et s’appuie sur une prise d’indices multiples, à différents niveaux. Les processus d’inférence permettent en effet de construire une information à partir d’un contexte, sans qu’elle soit directement et explicitement fournie par celui-ci.

Les processus inférentiels peuvent porter sur les éléments de la langue, les attitudes, les comportements, les pensées, les émotions, les attentes, les intentions ou encore la culture de l’interlocuteur.

Si toute communication implique des inférences, certaines configurations de communication y sont particulièrement propices : la négociation, l’argumentation, l’interculturel, la communication exolingue…

En langue étrangère plus particulièrement, selon C. Poussard (2000 : 203)[3], « l’inférence peut permettre de reconstruire un message, un passage, un mot à partir du contexte et des connaissances personnelles ou bien de compenser la non-compréhension d’un message, d’un passage ou d’un mot ». Tout apprenant d’une langue étrangère met en place des processus inférentiels dans le cadre d’une situation de compréhension et de restitution, allant jusqu’à faire appel à des inférences émotionnelles dans le cadre plus large d’une situation d’interaction orale. Par rapport à l’interaction orale en L1, ces processus sont probablement amplifiés en L2 du fait d’un déficit de compréhension du discours du locuteur natif, d’un déficit de lexique ou de différences culturelles…

Ce colloque interdisciplinaire a pour objectif d’interroger le cas particulier de la communication orale en L2, quelle que soit la langue impliquée. Il rassemblera des réflexions de différents champs de recherche (linguistique, psycholinguistique, psychologie cognitive, didactique des langues) sur la notion d’inférence à partir de communications fondées sur une approche empirique (études de cas). Les intervenants sont invités à s’appuyer sur des corpus de données orales ou multimodales.

Il s’agira de tenter de répondre aux questions suivantes :
– en quoi les inférences effectuées en L2 sont-elles différentes de celles effectuées en L1 ?
– comment le locuteur de L2 interprète-t-il les éléments relatifs au comportement, aux attitudes, aux attentes, aux intentions ou encore à la culture de l’interlocuteur ?
– l’incompréhension génère-t-elle des inférences inadaptées voire fausses et quelles en sont les conséquences ?
– quelles marques linguistiques (telles que les hésitations, les répétitions, les marques d’incompréhension…) ou non-linguistiques (gestes, mimiques) l’apprenant de L2 va-t-il mobiliser et dans quels contextes ?
– les marques linguistiques et/ou discursives de l’inférence sont-elles similaires ou différentes dans la langue maternelle de l’apprenant et dans sa L2 ? Quelles conséquences pour sa performance en L2 ? Quelles stratégies discursives va-t-il mettre en place ?
– quelles pistes didactiques pourraient être envisagées afin d’aider l’apprenant dans sa gestion de l’inférence en L2 ?

Mots-Clés : inférence, corpus oraux, didactique, acquisition de la L2, psycholinguistique, ressources linguistiques, gestes.

Conférence plénière : Véronique Traverso, ICAR, UMR 5191, directrice de recherche au CNRS, université de Lyon 2

Comment répondre à cet appel ?
Le colloque comportera des communications (20 minutes + 10 minutes de questions) suivies, en fin de journée, de tables rondes réunissant les communicants selon les thématiques abordées. Les communications pourront être proposées en anglais, mais le français sera la langue de travail privilégiée lors des tables rondes.
Les propositions sont à adresser avant le 1er octobre 2015 à l’adresse suivante : colloque.icol2@gmail.com
Elles comporteront le titre, le(s) nom(s), le(s) prénom(s), le rattachement institutionnel, et l’adresse courriel du ou des auteurs, puis le résumé en français ou en anglais (500 mots maximum) ainsi que 5 références bibliographiques. Le résumé expliciteraclairement la question à l’étude, les données utilisées, la méthode d’analyse, les résultats.
Toutes les propositions de communications seront évaluées anonymement par 2 membres du comité scientifique.

Pour toute question relative à l’organisation du colloque ou discussion scientifique, vous pouvez également contacter les organisateurs à cette adresse : colloque.icol2@gmail.com

Calendrier et lieu
1er octobre 2015 : date limite d’envoi des propositions
15 décembre 2015 : notification d’acceptation des propositions et diffusion du programme
15 janvier 2016 : ouverture des inscriptions
Ce colloque se tiendra à l’université Paul-Valéry Montpellier 3, site Saint Charles (arrêt de tram : Albert 1er), les 12 et 13 mai 2016.

Frais d’inscription : 40 €
Les frais comportent le repas de vendredi midi et les pauses café.

Publications envisagées
Il est prévu de publier une sélection des communications sous forme de numéro thématique dans la revue Les Cahiers de Praxématique.

Comité d’organisation
Caroline David
Isabelle Ronzetti

Comité scientifique
Wilfrid Andrieu, LERMA, EA 853, université Aix-Marseille
Christine Béal, Praxiling, UMR 5267, université Paul-Valéry Montpellier 3
Nathalie Blanc, Epsylon, EA 4556, université Paul-Valéry Montpellier 3
Alex Boulton, Atilf, UMR 7118, université de Lorraine
Paul Cappeau, FoReLL, EA 3816, université de Poitiers
Isabelle Gaudy-Campbell, IDEA, EA 2338, université de Lorraine
Muriel Grosbois, CeLiSo, EA 7332, université Paris IV
Sylvie Hanote, FoReLL, EA 3816, université de Poitiers
Jean-Marc Lavaur, Epsylon, EA 4556, université Paul-Valéry Montpellier 3
Catherine Paulin, LiLPa, EA 1339, université de Strasbourg
Kerry Mullan, RMIT University of Melbourne
Cécile Poussard, EMMA, EA 741, université Paul-Valéry Montpellier 3
Stéphanie Roussel, LACES, EA 4140, université de Bordeaux
Henry Tyne, Équipe CRESEM, université de Perpignan Via Domitia
Laurence Vincent-Durroux, LIDILEM, EA 609, université Grenoble-Alpes


[1] Montaigne, M. (1924), (1978), Les Essais. éd. par Pierre Villey, Presses Universitaires de France (3ème édition).
[2] Bailly, D. (1998). Les mots de la didactique des langues. Le cas de l’anglaisLexique. Paris-Gap : Ophrys.
[3] Poussard, C. (2000). Compréhension de l’anglais oral et technologies éducatives. Thèse de doctorat, université Paris 7, 390 p.

  _________________________________________________________________________________________

Appel à communications
7e Rendez-vous de Géographie culturelle, Ethnologie et Études culturelles
en Languedoc-Roussillon

Organisé par :
UMR 5281 ART-Dev– Université Paul Valéry Montpellier 3 – Route de Mende – 34199 Montpellier cedex 5 artdev@univ-montp3.fr – http://art-dev.cnrs.fr/
EMMA EA 741 Université Paul Valéry Montpellier 3 – Route de Mende – 34199 Montpellier cedex 5 isabelle.ronzetti@univ-montp3.fr – http://pays-anglophones.upv.univ-montp3.fr/

The English version of this CFP can be downloaded here

Colloque international
« Utopies Culturelles Contemporaines »
16-18 Juin 2016, Université de Nîmes (France)

Note d’intention scientifique :
La 7e édition des « Rendez-vous de Géographie culturelle, Ethnologie et Études culturelles en Languedoc-Roussillon » souhaite explorer les utopies culturelles contemporaines, leurs processus de formalisation, leurs significations, leurs localisations sociales et géographiques. A une époque souvent décrite comme saturée de flux de communication et d’innovations technologiques, où les rêves les plus fous de l’humanité semblent déjà avoir été réalisés, comment comprendre à nouveaux frais la notion d’utopie et son succès toujours renouvelé ? La notion d’ « utopie culturelle contemporaine », proposée ici, postule qu’aux dimensions plus politiques et scientifiques des utopies du passé, s’ajouterait une dimension plus culturelle et globale, avec toutes les nuances et controverses qui se dessinent à propos des différents rôles assignés à la culture aujourd’hui. Le colloque souhaite définir les contours de cette nouvelle dimension et expliquer les raisons de son émergence en mobilisant les outils combinés de plusieurs disciplines. Plusieurs types de questionnements seront privilégiés pour saisir la complexité propre à la notion d’utopie culturelle.
Une première approche questionne les manières à travers lesquelles l’utopie, traditionnellement conçue comme hors de l’espace et du temps, est aujourd’hui rabattue par certains discours sur l’hypothèse d’un « vivre-ensemble » communautaire qui la relocaliserait en des lieux ou autour de groupes sociaux particuliers. Est-il devenu utopique de vouloir vivre ensemble ? L’utopie du « vivre-ensemble » n’est-elle que la conséquence d’un délitement du lien social, ou dit-elle quelque chose d’autre des mythes qui travaillent les sociétés contemporaines ? Est-elle seulement une réaction nostalgique au sentiment répandu de ne plus pouvoir « faire communauté », ou joue-t-elle un rôle dans la fabrique contemporaine des identités collectives ? En figurant un double processus de délocalisation et de relocalisation, il semble que l’utopie a considérablement changé dans son contenu, ce qui nécessite d’en renouveler l’approche.
Un autre questionnement concerne les champs d’application de l’utopie. Dans le domaine de l’urbanisme et dans celui de l’architecture contemporaine, des visions utopiques ont durablement soutenu l’innovation en permettant de dépasser la simple réponse à des nécessités fonctionnelles. En retour, comment ces opérations conduisent-elles à reconfigurer la notion d’utopie, à l’apprivoiser ou à en faire évoluer les frontières ? Comment la prolifération des visions utopiques du territoire (démocratie participative, terroir, développement durable etc.), plus ou moins adaptées aux exigences du fonctionnement collectif, contribuent-elles au développement culturel ? Faut-il voir une utopie contemporaine dans l’obsession à vouloir inventorier le patrimoine culturel, au risque de le figer et de l’aseptiser ? De même, dans le monde du marketing territorial et touristique, l’appel à des outils habituellement associés à l’utopie tels que le post-humain ou la réalité augmentée conduisent à reconfigurer ses terrains d’application. Où se réfugie l’utopie lorsque la technologie met lieux et oeuvres à la portée de tous ? Sur le plan du politique, enfin, comment garder l’utopie comme horizon, sans l’adosser à la vision nostalgique d’un âge d’or ni la transformer en argument électoral ? Que deviennent les utopies politiques quand l’utopisme n’est plus qu’une rhétorique du bonheur ?
Une réflexion sur l’élargissement de la notion d’utopie à l’ensemble du champ culturel ouvre nécessairement sur une approche critique. Il convient ici de considérer sérieusement l’hypothèse d’une confiscation des utopies par différentes instances : lorsque des produits commerciaux sont vendus comme utopies à des consommateurs incapables de les acquérir, que devient l’utopie véritable, celle qui a fonction critique, dérangeante, subversive ? Ici, c’est la question de la dévaluation des utopies qui demande à être posée, car elle coexiste avec un glissement du sens associé aux valeurs culturelles. Dans un monde marchand, on peut se demander si même l’utopie a vocation à être monnayée, négociée, échangée.
Ainsi, le statut des utopies a considérablement changé. En devenant culturelles, elles sont à la fois diluées et banalisées. Elles deviennent alors des repères stables plutôt que des ouvertures radicales sur l’ailleurs, des références à partager plutôt que des lignes de partage. Leur lien au politique se dissout tandis qu’elles participent à la mise en spectacle de l’environnement naturel ou de certaines cultures jugées minoritaires ou menacées. Il est donc urgent d’interroger les nouveaux vocabulaires de l’utopie, dans les univers fictionnels comme dans la réalité. Ce questionnement concerne la littérature, les arts, la création numérique, mais aussi l’action politique, le monde économique, la relation aux territoires. Un questionnement supplémentaire, plus réflexif, concerne les différentes disciplines scientifiques et la manière dont elles prennent part à la redéfinition des utopies. Plutôt que de dresser un catalogue des utopies contemporaines ou des projets « futuristes » actuels, l’ambition de ces rencontres est finalement de réfléchir à la question de la survivance, aujourd’hui, sous quelles formes et à quelles fins, de la pensée utopique. Au-delà de l’application à des cas précis, la réflexion portera aussi sur le devenir même du concept d’utopie.

Des communications sont attendues autour des axes suivants :
– Utopie et « vivre-ensemble » aujourd’hui.
– Utopie et post-humain, réalité augmentée.
– Utopie et urbanisme, architecture, territoires de l’utopie aujourd’hui.
– Utopie et politique, instrumentalisations et subversions de l’utopie par le politique aujourd’hui.
– Utopie, commerce et communication marchande.
– Utopie et mise en spectacle des identités collectives, labels et patrimoines.
– Les nouveaux vocabulaires de l’utopie.
Date limite de soumission des propositions de communication : 15 juin 2015

Comité d’organisation
– Catherine Bernié-Boissard, catherine.bernie-boissard@wanadoo.fr
Géographie, Université de Nîmes, UMR 5281 ART-Dev, Université Montpellier 3
– Claude Chastagner, claude.chastagner@univ-montp3.fr
Etudes culturelles, EMMA, EA 741 Etudes anglophones, Université Montpellier 3
– Dominique Crozat, dominique.crozat@univ-montp3.fr
Géographie, UMR 5281 ART-Dev, Université Montpellier 3
– Laurent-Sébastien Fournier, laurent.fournier@univ-nantes.fr
Ethnologie, EA 3260 CENS, Université de Nantes

Evaluation des propositions par le comité scientifique : été 2015
Acceptation/refus des propositions : 15 octobre 2015

Les propositions seront présentées sous la forme d’un document Word d’une à deux pages, comprises entre un minimum de 2000 signes et un maximum de 4000 et comprendront 5 mots clés : elles devront mentionner nom et prénom, discipline d’origine, statut, rattachement institutionnel de l’auteur et adresse électronique.
Les propositions seront impérativement rédigées en Times New Roman de 12 points, interligne 1,5. Le fichier informatisé du résumé envoyé aux organisateurs par voie électronique sera simplement nommé par les nom et prénom de l’auteur sous la forme : NOMPrénom.doc.
Les propositions de communication seront adressées exclusivement à :
christiane.lagarde@univ-montp3.fr
Les communications pourront être données en français ou en anglais. Prévoir de participer à la totalité du colloque au cours duquel plusieurs tables-rondes seront organisées avec la participation des intervenants.

Comité scientifique
Jean-Pierre Augustin, professeur de géographie, Bordeaux
Sergio Dalla Bernardina, professeur d’anthropologie, Brest
Jean Davallon, professeur de sciences de l’information et de la communication, AvignonAlessandro Dozena, professeur de géographie, UFRN Natal, Brésil
Guillaume Faburel, professeur d’urbanisme, Lyon
Philippe Joron, professeur de sociologie, Montpellier
Régis Keerle, maître de conférences en géographie, Rennes
Rem Koolhas, architecte, Rotterdam, Pays-Bas
André Micoud, directeur de recherches en sociologie (CNRS), Saint-Etienne
Dorothy Noyes, Professor of English and Comparative Studies, Ohio State University, USA
Claire Omhovère, professeur de littérature anglophone, Montpellier
Jean-Marc Stébé, professeur de sociologie, Nancy
Kun Zang, professeur d’urbanisme et d’environnement, Université du Sichuan, Chine

Partenaires
Université de Nîmes, Université de Montpellier 3
CNRS Languedoc-Roussillon
Ville de Nîmes, Conseil Général du Gard, Région Languedoc-Roussillon

CFP Utopies Culturelles Contemporaines Fr

CFP Utopies Culturelles Contemporaines GB

_________________________________________________________________________________________

EMMA (Etudes Montpelliéraines du Monde Anglophone,Université Paul-Valéry Montpellier 3, France)
in partnership with Coastal Carolina University (SC, USA) and MIGRINTER (UMR CNRS-Poitiers, France) is setting up a five year program

Ecotones: Encounters, Crossings, and Communities
2015-2019

An « ecotone » is a transitional area between two or more distinct ecological communities, for instance the zone between field and forest, mountain and ocean, or between sea and land. The two ecosystems may be separated by a sharp boundary line or may merge gradually. An « ecotone » may also indicate a place where two communities meet, at times creolizing or germinating into a new community.

We will be borrowing this term traditionally used in environmental studies and geography, and apply it to postcolonial studies in disciplines such as literature, history, the arts, translation studies, the social and political sciences, ethnic studies, ecocriticism, etc.

In the continuity of the program « Diasporas, Cultures of Mobilities, ‘Race’ » that was implemented by EMMA (Université Paul-Valéry Montpellier, France) in partnership with several universities between 2011 and 2013, « Ecotones » seeks to continue exploring the « complex chemistry » of creolizing worlds (Robin Cohen), the « contact zones » between cultures (Mary Louise Pratt) in contexts such as migration, diaspora, refugee movements and other postcolonial displacements and environmental evacuations, among other major historical events.

Conjointly with the social sciences, pride of place will also be given to the literary and artistic representations of these micro and macro transformations, to the ways aesthetic forms not only represent but also contribute to shaping and modifying a process.

The ecotones, as points of contact or points of friction, between the Indian Ocean, the South and East China Seas, the African continent, the Caribbean and the North American continent will provide the main frame of approach. The use of concepts like « diaspora space » (Avtar Brah) and « Afrasia » (Gaurav Desai) will be beneficial.

The emphasis will be put on communities in their relation to place, neighborhood, and environment, including the precise circumstances these communities are modified over periods of time, the factors of change, and the many ways these elements are represented and mediated in literature and the arts. How do the languages, the cultural practices, the scientific knowledge, and environmental concerns meet and transform in these newly constructed ecotones? How does the merging of different ecologies and communities produce creolization and new identities? What postcolonial approaches to global ecologies (Elizabeth DeLoughrey) can be set up in the context of « transcolonial » relations (Shu-mei Shih and Françoise Lionnet)? Can we identify an emerging cosmopolitics in these contact zones (Michel Agier) ?

The modalities of such processes of (re-)invention will have to be examined from different angles, taking in the conflicts and the productive exchanges and frictions between the other and the self. Literary and political movements and the history of ideas necessarily cross paths and pollinate, following different routes and creating a multiple and diverse universe, in which a single and fixed origin can only be questioned.

Specific lesser-known communities will be focused on to understand how new relations to specific places are being formed as we speak, and constitute new forms of belonging, bonding, and citizenship. The aim is to understand how everyday practices, languages, customs, beliefs, rituals and ideas evolve, maintain themselves or transform, when two communities merge with, or confront each other. What are the realities when one community takes precedence over, or absorbs, the other one, when religions, cultures and languages are implanted in postcolonial locales across the globe. How do the descendents of two indentured or migrant communities, for instance, negotiate the space and interact with each other ? Keeping in mind the multiple interpretation of the term, micro-spaces will be examined to understand how they are negotiated and represented.

A series of interdisciplinary events will be co-organized by EMMA (Université Paul-Valéry Montpellier 3, France), Coastal Carolina University (SC, USA) and MIGRINTER (UMR CNRS-Poitiers, France) in collaboration with partner universities.
Specific calls for papers will be circulated to create networks, announce conferences and workshops, and set up events. Publications will be planned in the different venues and at other partner universities.

The 3-G Network on the three Guyanas (Guyana, French Guyane and Suriname) will bring into focus one of the best possible examples of Ecotones in the literal and metaphoric interpretations of the word.
2015 being the 40th anniversary of the independence of Suriname and 2016 the 50th anniversary of the independence of Guyana, will provide excellent opportunities to bring that part of the world into the limelight, in relation to 70 years of départementalisation in the French Guyane.
Events will be hosted in Amsterdam (October 2015, University of Amsterdam, University of Antwerpen, Université de Liège, the Université Catholique de Louvain and Werkgroep Caraïbische Letteren), Montpellier (June 2016, Université Paul-Valéry Montpellier 3) and London (October 2016, Institute of English Studies, School of Advanced Studies, University of London).

The modalities will be defined in separate forthcoming announcements.
Feel free to send an email if you wish to be kept informed of developments and events.

Co-convenors of the Program « Ecotones » and Coordinators of the 3-G Network:
– Dr Thomas Lacroix (MIGRINTER, UMR CNRS–Poitiers, France)  thomas.lacroix@univ-poitiers.fr
– Dr Judith Misrahi-Barak (EMMA, Université Paul-Valéry Montpellier 3, France)  judith.misrahi-barak@univ-montp3.fr
– Dr Maggi Morehouse (Coastal Carolina University, SC, USA)  morehouse@coastal.edu

CFP Ecotones 2015-2019

_________________________________________________________________________________________

La singularité et la solidarité dans la littérature et les arts britanniques des XIX-XX-XXIe siècles

Les deux notions de singularité et solidarité s’articulent aux travaux sur l’humble, entamés au sein d’EMMA, et sur la démocratie, en cours dans l’un des axes du CAS et auxquels participe le groupe ARTLab. Elles supposent une relation à l’autre (de type affectif, social, politique, éthique, etc.) ainsi qu’une différenciation, un souci de l’autre mais aussi de soi, une relation entre l’individu et le groupe où éthique et politique entrent en jeu. En quoi ces deux notions peuvent-elles également impliquer une manière particulière d’articuler le récit de soi à une histoire collective ? Cette attention littéraire et artistique aux invisibilités singulières tracerait-elle la voie d’une possible « démocratie narrative » ? En semblant nier toute autonomie radicale du sujet pour lui préférer une autonomie relative ou « mutuelle », la littérature et les arts britanniques conduisent-ils à l’émergence d’une interdépendance fondée sur l’attention à la singularité dans sa dimension concrète et sensible, et pouvant se révéler dans les termes d’une praxis ?

Il s’agira d’explorer ces notions et les relations qu’elles impliquent dans la littérature et les arts britanniques avec des outils divers, empruntés peut-être à la phénoménologie ou à l’éthique, entre autres domaines. L’on pourra s’inspirer de Lévinas, mais encore et surtout d’autres penseurs comme Aristote et ses héritiers, de Ricoeur, Foucault, Agamben, Rancière, Derrida, Attridge, LeBlanc, Rosanvallon, Butler, Pelluchon ou d’autres encore.

Mots clés : pauvreté, communauté, collaboration, négociation, échanges, politique/polis, la cité et la vie bonne, attention, réciprocité, démocratie, le commun, solidarité, l’intime

L’objectif de ce séminaire sera de fédérer des talents et d’élaborer un partenariat entre nos centres de recherche.

La première rencontre, qui aura lieu le vendredi 9 octobre 2015 à Montpellier 3, sera l’occasion de faire un état des lieux de nos forces, de faire émerger des thématiques et outils critique et théoriques, et d’affiner nos objectifs scientifiques tout en réfléchissant à la forme que nous désirons donner ultérieurement à ce séminaire.

Les commentaires sont fermés.